Registration is now open for Beastly Modernisms

An international conference on the animal turn in modernist studies.

University of Glasgow (12-13th September 2019)

You can register here! We welcome delegates from across the arts, animal studies, and beyond, at all levels of study. 

Our programme is available on our website

Follow us @BeastlyMods

Contact us: beastlymodernisms@gmail.com

If you are a postgraduate student based in Scotland attending as a delegate, and would like to be considered for the Scottish Network of Modernist Studies student travel bursary please email us to register your interest.

At 7.00 pm on Sunday 7th July in the Levi Fox Hall Edward’s Boys will give their first performance of Wit and Science by John Redford prior to touring Oxford, London and Genoa, Italy where they will perform at the invitation of the Société Internationale pour l’étude du Théâtre Médiéval.

Redford, composer, organist and choirmaster of St Paul’s Cathedral, seems to have written the play around 1540. It exists in one manuscript in the British Library. Part comic allegory and part satire on education, and including four songs, Wit and Science is important for several reasons: it spawned imitations and sequels; it is a rare example of an English ‘school play’; and it tells us something about how a Tudor schoolmaster understood his educational project. 

Performances

Sunday 7th July, 7.00pm – Levi Fox Hall CV37 6BE
Tickets: £10; Concessions: £5

Monday 8th July, 6.00pm – The Chapel. New College, Oxford OX1 3BN
Tickets: £10; Concessions: £5

Tuesday 9th July, 7.00pm – the Priory Church of the Order of St John, Clerkenwell, London EC1V 4JJ
Tickets: £12; Concessions: £6

Tickets for performances may be purchased by means of the online Box Office https://www.ticketsource.co.uk/kes

Friday 12th July, 7.00pm for the Société Internationale pour l’étude du Théâtre Médiéval at the Palazzo Ducale di Genova, Italy

The Journal of Literature and Science http://www.literatureandscience.org is once again looking for reviewers to review various articles published in the last year to 18 months in the field of literature and science.

Please find below a number of articles that we would like to offer for review for the Journal’s forthcoming 2019 Winter issue. Its largely first come, first served, so do get in touch with an offer to review a specific article by emailing Michelle Geric m.geric@westminster.ac.uk

I would also be very happy to receive suggestions for other relevant articles for review that aren’t listed below – please do let me know.

Reviews should be 750 words long. For more details please follow the link: http://www.literatureandscience.org or contact Michelle m.geric@westminster.ac.uk to register your interest.

SUGGESTED ARTICLES:

Sandra Robinson. “Databases and Doppelgängers: New Articulations of Power.” Configurations 26. 4 (2018): 411-440. 

Valerie O'Brien. “‘A Genius for Unreality’: Neurodiversity in Elizabeth Bowen's Eva Trout.” Journal of Modern Literature 42. 2 (2019): 75-93.

Lorenzo Servitje. “Of Drugs and Droogs: Cultural Dynamics, Psychopharmacology, and Neuroscience in Anthony Burgess’s A Clockwork Orange.” Literature and Medicine 36. 1 (2018): 101-123.

Kurt Beals, “‘Do the New Poets Think? It's Possible’: Computer Poetry and Cyborg Subjectivity.” Configurations 26. 2 (2018): 149-177. 

Ursula K Heise. “Science Fiction and the Time Scales of the Anthropocene.” ELH 86. 2 (2019): 275-304.

Jocelyn Rodal. “Patterned Ambiguities: Virginia Woolf, Mathematical Variables, and Form.” Configurations 26. 1 (2018): 73-101.

Christy Rieger. “Chemical Romance: Genre and Materia Medica in Late-Victorian Drug Fiction.” Victorian Literature and Culture 47. 2 (2019): 409-437.

Pascale McCullough Manning. “The Hyde We Live In: Stevenson, Evolution, and the Anthropogenic Fog.” Victorian Literature and Culture 46. 1 (2018): 181–99.

Katja Jylkka, “‘Witness the Plesiosaurus’: Geological Traces and the Loch Ness Monster Narrative.” Configurations 26. 2 (2018): 207-234.

Thomas M. Stuart, “Out of Time: Queer Temporality and Eugenic Monstrosity.” Victorian Studies 60. 2 (2018): 218-227.

Larsen, Haley. “‘The Spirit of Electricity’: Henry James's In the Cage and Electric Female Imagination at the Turn of the Century.” Configurations 26. 4 (2018): 357-387. 

Elisavet Ioannidou. “Neo-Victorian Visions of the Future: Science, Crime, and Modernity.” Victoriographies 8. 2 (2018): 187-205. 

Mary Kuhn, “Dickinson and the Politics of Plant Sensibility.” ELH 85. 1 (2018): 141-170.

Doreen Thierauf. “Tending to Old Stories: Daniel Deronda and Hysteria, Revisited. Victorian Literature and Culture 46. 2 (2018): 443-465.

Sara Brio. “The Shocking Truth: Science, Religion, and Ancient Egypt in Early Nineteenth-Century Fiction.” Nineteenth-Century Contexts 40. 4 (2018): 331-344.

John Rogers. “Newton's Arian Epistemology and the Cosmogony of Paradise Lost.” ELH 86. 1 (2019): 77-106. 

Alexander Jakobidze-Gitman. “The Rise of Machines in Reformation Nuremberg: Jakob Ayrer's ‘Fastnachtspiel of Fritz Dölla with His Bewitched Fiddle’.” Configurations 26. 4 (2018): 441-469. 

I would also like to draw the attention of potential reviewers to the recent issue of Literature and Medicine which is themed “Chemistry, Disability, and Frankenstein” (volume 36, no. 2, 2018). Please do get in touch if there is an article from this issue that you would like to review.

Word follows of a fundraising campaign which is not officially connected to the BSLS, but in which BSLS members might be interested:

Charles Lyell (1797 - 1875) is well known for his part in the Darwinian evolutionary debates, his travels to America and his role in convincing readers of the significance of 'deep time'. During the past decade, Lyell's geographical theory of climate and his subdivisions of recent geological periods have gained renewed attention in connection with discussions of climate change and the Anthropocene. The Lyell archive is almost certainly the most important manuscript collection relating to nineteenth century science still in private hands.  At its core are 294 notebooks, which provide a daily record of Lyell's private thoughts, reading notes, travels, field observations and conversations from the mid-1820s to his death half a century later.

In order for the family to meet inheritance tax, the Lyell notebooks were sold to an unknown foreign buyer towards the end of last year. Fortunately, the UK government has imposed a temporary export ban to enable fundraising to purchase these remarkable documents, conserve them, and make them available on-line for free to the public. The University of Edinburgh Library, which already has the largest collection of Lyell material, is organizing the campaign. The website for this became active at the end of last week. The sum required is £1,444,000; major donors have already pledged more than a third of the total needed.

The temporary export ban has an initial deadline of 15th July, so time is extremely short.  If significant progress is made, then it may be extended until 15th October. Therefore, all who are interested are asked to pledge a donation, which will only be collected when the required amount is achieved. For more information about the notebooks and to make a pledge, please click on https://www.ed.ac.uk/giving/save-lyell-notebooks/pledge-to-save/

If you, your students and friends can give anything to this campaign--even five pounds or a pound--it will make a big difference, not least in showing larger donors that there is substantial public interest and concern. It would be great if we can get the donor count over 1000.

I'd appreciate it if you could pass on this message to anyone who might be interested, and to any other relevant lists.

Jim Secord (jas1010@cam.ac.uk)
Professor of History and Philosophy of Science
Director, Darwin Correspondence Project
University of Cambridge

Thanks to the support of the Institute of Modern Languages Research at the University of London (@IMLR_News), the Association for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France (@asmcf), the British Society for Literature and Science (@TheBSLS), and the Centre for Environmental Humanities at the University of Bristol (@UoBrisCEH), we were able to hold a workshop for early career researchers working on French and Francophone contexts (day one), followed by a widening participation event for teachers and A-Level students (day two).  Day one involved the speakers and four participants, which proved to be advantageous for focussed discussion of the papers as work-in-progress for a forthcoming special issue edited by Daniel Finch-Race, which will be the primary academic publication from the event. On day two, four workshops were delivered to nine teachers and A-Level learners: close readings of literary texts (session one) and films (session three) bracketed parallel workshops on translation (session two).

Day one began with a panel on nineteenth-century French texts. James Illingworth approached George Sand’s volcanic imagery as an instance of eco-feminism avant la lettre. Sarah Jones considered Emile Zola’s interest in madness and hysteria. Arthur Rose returned to Zola’s Germinal as a source text for thinking about coal use in the Anthropocene. After a short break, Keir Waddington delivered an excellent keynote on trends in French environmental historiography as part of an argument that sought to recover the role of topography in thinking about environmental health. After lunch, there were two presentations on twentieth-century francophone writing. Joe Ford’s close reading of key passages in Albert Camus’ L’Étranger showed how the narrative plays with subject positions to problematize the protagonist’s agency. Holly Langstaff reflected on the animal presence that persists across Maurice Blanchot’s oeuvre, particularly his ‘mouche importune’. In the final session, Frances Hemsley considered how contemporary Rwandan testimonial writing demonstrates the entwinement of insect-eradication campaigns with the forced displacement of groups during the late colonial period. Kasia Mika introduced us to the ‘cholera chronotope’ as a mode for considering time and place in activist documentaries about UN peacekeepers introducing cholera into Haiti after the 2010 earthquake.

On day two, Langstaff, Illingworth, Ford, Rose and Finch-Race delivered four one-hour workshops on how the environmental humanities and medical humanities can be used in teaching A-Level French. The close-knit audience was exceptional: each of the ECRs delivering the workshop commented upon the engagement of the teachers and learners. At the end of the day, the audience’s feedback was overwhelmingly positive, with several people referring to how the sessions provided the means and motivation to develop their work.

Arthur Rose

Tags:

Oxford University’s Gardens, Libraries and Museums, including the Oxford University Museum of Natural History, the Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford Botanic Garden and the History of Science Museum have been awarded 11 PhD studentships through the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Collaborative Doctoral Partnership (CDP) programme. For more information, or if you are interested in proposing a collaborative doctoral project, click here.

The Oxford University Museum of Natural History is hosting an evening on Dinosaurs and Art on Thursday 13th June at 7 pm, featuring Will Tattersdill (Birmingham), Verity Burke (Birmingham) and David Button (Natural History Museum). To see the poster, click here:

Dinosaurs and Art OUMNH A4 poster

To book, click here

Friday 10 May 2019
9:15-16:45
University of Bristol – 10 Woodland Road
#EnviroMedicalHumanities

This free conference will feature eight papers by early-career researchers and a keynote by Professor Keir Waddington (@keir_waddington).

On the following day, Saturday 11th, five of the speakers will be at the University of Bristol's School of Modern Languages to deliver masterclasses for teachers and pupils.

These activities are supported by the Institute of Modern Languages Research at the University of London (@IMLR_News), the Association for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France (@asmcf), the British Society for Literature and Science (@TheBSLS), and the Centre for Environmental Humanities at the University of Bristol (@UoBrisCEH).

You are welcome to register on Eventbrite for as much of the programme as you like:
www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/enviro-medical-approaches-to-modern-francophone-culture-tickets-60885766968.

9:15, Welcome
Dan Finch-Race

9:30, Panel 1 James Illingworth (Exeter) – George Sand's Volcanic Imagination
Sarah Jones (Oxford) – Zola: Medicine and Madness
Arthur Rose (Bristol) – Coal Politics: Receiving Émile Zola's Germinal

*11:00, Break

11:30, Keynote Keir Waddington (Cardiff) – A Flat Past? History, Environment, Topography and Medicine

*12:30, Lunch break

13:30, Panel 2 Joseph Ford (IMLR) – Towards an 'Environmental Ethic' in the Literary Writing of Albert Camus
Beatrice Ivey (Stirling) – Remembering Natural Disasters with Nathacha Appanah and Nina Bouraoui
Holly Langstaff (Oxford/Warwick) – 'Une mouche importune': Reading Insects in Maurice Blanchot

*15:00, Break

15:30, Panel 3 Frances Hemsley (Bristol) – Health and Environment in 'New' Rwandan Testimonial Literature
Kasia Mika (Amsterdam) – Cholera Chronotopes: Living in and through 'the Time of Cholera'

16:30, Closing remarks
Dan Finch-Race

Half-day international symposium. Friday 7 June 2019 at 2-8 pm. Free admission.

The Royal Institution, 21 Albemarle Street, London W1S 4BS

Founded in 1799, the Royal Institution became the home of science education and the site of scientific discoveries and technological innovations which changed the world. In its early years, this remarkable scientific agenda was accompanied by an equally impressive programme of literary education, as luminaries such as Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Thomas Campbell and Sydney Smith took to the lecture podium to dazzle the fashionable male and female audiences of London with the latest advances in literary criticism and aesthetics. Science, poetry and philosophy combined in the work of the ‘chemical philosopher’ Humphry Davy and his literary friends, making the Royal Institution a centre of Romanticism as well as a focal point of the thriving public lecture culture of the time. This half-day symposium with talks by leading scholars will restore the forgotten literary history of the Royal Institution and highlight its unique interdisciplinary contribution to British Romantic culture.

Speakers: David Duff (Queen Mary University of London), Frank James (Royal Institution), Hattie Lloyd Edmondson (Science Museum), Seamus Perry (University of Oxford), Sharon Ruston (University of Lancaster), Sarah Zimmerman (Fordham University)

The event will conclude with a wine reception to celebrate the launch of Sarah Zimmerman’s new book The Romantic Literary Lecture in Britain (Oxford University Press), based partly on research done at the Royal Institution.

The event is free and open to everyone, including members of the public.

Click here for further details and to register for a free place

Organisers: David Duff d.duff@qmul.ac.uk; Sarah Zimmerman Zimmerman@fordham.edu

Sponsored by the London-Paris Romanticism Seminar, the Fordham Romanticism Group, Queen Mary University of London, and the Royal Institution of Great Britain

Workshop organised by Dr Kim M. Hajek and Prof. Mary S. Morgan

3 June 2019, London School of Economics and Political Science

In the history of science, especially of the human and observational sciences, it has often been the case that knowledge-making activities drew upon many ‘voices’—accounts of a storm given by different observers; patient voices incorporated into a psychological case history; myths transcribed by an anthropologist. What many of these examples share is that the information provided by different voices takes narrative form in its own right. Yet scientists have also organised them into related groupings or broader narratives, as a way to elucidate particular research problems.

In this workshop, we ask how narrative has helped scientists to configure extended chunks of information, and ultimately to manage a multiplicity of voices in their enquiry. Using case studies from across a range of fields, workshop participants explore the roles played by narrative forms of explanation both within and across the contributions of multiple voices to science. Of particular concern are the ways that narrative serves to order polyphonic material into a larger epistemic scheme, and reciprocally, how narrative valorises or suppresses particular voices, or indeed shapes what counts as a ‘voice’ at all.

This workshop is organised as part of the Narrative Science Project, funded by the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement No 694732). For more information on the project, please see our website: www.narrative-science.org

Speakers:

Dr Debjani Bhattacharyya, Drexel University
Ordering Cyclones: The Courtroom in the Making of Meteorological Sciences in Colonial India.

A/Prof. Devin Griffiths, University of Southern California
Darwin, Entrainment, and the Ecology of Form..

Dr Kim Hajek, LSE
Silencing Suggestion? Narratives of Suggestive Psychotherapy and Category Disputes in Hippolyte Bernheim’s Psychological Cases.

Prof. Isabelle Kalinowski, ENS, and Dr Camille Joseph, Université Paris 8
Unheard Words. Franz Boas and the Anthropology of Voices.

A/Prof. Birgit Lang, University of Melbourne
The Case of the Sexological Patient. From Narrative Polyphony to Visual Affect and Fragmentation.

Prof. Harro Maas, Centre Walras-Pareto, University of Lausanne
A Community on Paper: Reflections on a Witness Seminar on the History of Experimental Economics.

A/Prof. Jill Slinger (and Dr Lotte Bontje), TU Delft
On Narrative Competition in Coastal Policy Development.

Dr Rhianedd Smith, University of Reading
Weaving Narratives from Data and Myth: Multi-Vocal Heritage Interpretation at Glastonbury Abbey.

Attending the Workshop:

The workshop will take place at the LSE campus in central London, from approximately 9 am to 6 pm.

Attendance at the workshop is free and open to all; however, places are limited. Please register your interest in attending by emailing Dr Dominic Berry (d.j.berry@lse.ac.uk) as soon as possible.

The deadline for registration is Monday 20 May. Places will be confirmed by 22 May at the latest.

PhD Travel Bursaries:

To increase participation from the postgraduate community, we are making available 4 travel bursaries, each of up to £250. These can be used to recover the cost of train or airfare for those who wish to attend, and who are currently enrolled on a PhD programme, preferably with research interests directly related to the workshop themes.

To apply for a PhD travel bursary please write to Dr Dominic Berry (D.J.Berry@lse.ac.uk). Please include: Your name; university affiliation; thesis title; no more than 100 words on how this workshop relates to your research.

The deadline for applications to the travel bursary is Monday 13 May.

You will be notified as to the outcome of your application shortly thereafter. Applicants will be selected to ensure a diverse range of research interests and institutions are represented. 

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