Articles by Jenni Halpin

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As many of you will recall, we are moving to a quarterly publication of the BSLS newsletter; in hopes that our inaugural Winter Newsletter will be richly more than a masthead followed by filler, BSLS members are invited to submit items suitable for inclusion by Word attachment to jennihalpin@gmail.com. Please direct them to me by Tuesday, January 31. Notices referring to the past three months’ activities are welcomed.

I especially encourage you to send:

  • Notices of new books (including monographs and edited volumes) published by members;
  • Brief reports on science and literature events, seminars, conference panels, keynotes, and symposia organized by (or otherwise participated in by) members;
  • Funding awards in relevant areas;
  • Members’ completed PhDs (with note of title and awarding institution);
  • Festivals, exhibitions, public talks, media appearances, and other public engagement in the field by members; and
  • Forthcoming events to publicise, with CFPs, links, contact information, etc.

Please hold off on announcements of forthcoming books; in the shift to quarterly publication we focus on books members will find available when the Newsletter is published. However, I would like to underscore that a JPEG of a book's cover will look well in the Newsletter and is invited along with the Word document indicating publication information and an abstract.

Be mindful that the Society broadly defines ‘science’ to include areas such as medicine and technology. Hold items under 250 words, please, and note that memberships should be up to date for items to be included in the Newsletter. For details of renewals please contact the Membership Secretary, Jessica Roberts (j.roberts@edu.salford.ac.uk).

Gratefully,
Jenni Halpin, Newsletter Editor

BSLS members are invited to submit items suitable for inclusion in this autumn’s Newsletter by Word attachment to jennihalpin@gmail.com. Please direct them to me by Friday, October 28. Notices referring to the past twelve months’ activities are welcomed.

At this time we are also shifting to a quarterly publication. To that end, you can expect a similar call for submissions in January.

I especially encourage you to send:

  • Notices of new books (including monographs and edited volumes) published by members;
  • Brief reports on science and literature events, seminars, conference panels, keynotes, and symposia organized by (or otherwise participated in by) members;
  • Funding awards in relevant areas;
  • Members’ completed PhDs (with note of title and awarding institution);
  • Festivals, exhibitions, public talks, media appearances, and other public engagement in the field by members; and
  • Forthcoming events to publicise, with CFPs, links, contact information, etc.

Please hold off on announcements of forthcoming books; in the shift to quarterly publication we will focus on books members will find available when the Newsletter is published. However, I would like to underscore that a JPEG of a book's cover will look well in the Newsletter and is invited along with the Word document indicating publication information and an abstract.

Be mindful that the Society broadly defines ‘science’ to include areas such as medicine and technology. Hold items under 250 words, please, and note that memberships should be up to date for items to be included in the Newsletter. For details of renewals please contact the Membership Secretary, Jessica Roberts (j.roberts@edu.salford.ac.uk).

Gratefully,
Jenni Halpin, Newsletter Editor

 

The CFP is for a special issue of the journal Cogent Humanities on Ecotheory and the Premodern.

The link is here:  http://explore.cogentoa.com/call-for-special-issues/eco-theory-and-the-pre-modern

An international conference at Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK

20 - 22 May 2016

Many fields of culture, especially art and literature, religion and science, rely on the visual imagination. Its importance for our mental life has long made it a subject of interest to philosophers, and more recently it has been studied by psychologists, cognitive scientists, and now neuroscientists. This conference, which is the culmination of the AHRC-funded research project, ‘The Eye’s Mind: a Study of the Neural Basis of the Visual Imagination and of its Role in Culture’, will for the first time bring together specialists in all these areas with a view to laying the foundations for a new understanding of this vital human capacity.

To achieve this challenging goal the organisers seek proposals from specialists of graduate level and above in any relevant area to join the existing panel of keynote speakers in presenting their own research. Possible contributions would include: studies of the role of visual imaginative experience in any field of culture, analyses of the theoretical issues raised by imagery in the domains of philosophy and psychology, relevant work in cognitive science or neuroscience. Keynote speakers include Michael Tye (philosophy), Joel Pearson (neuroscience), Paul Broks (psychology), John Onians (art history), Adam Zeman (neurology).

Potential presenters should submit 250 word abstracts to m.mackisack@exeter.ac.uk by 29th February 2016 indicating whether platform or poster presentation is preferred. The registration fee will be kept to a minimum to cover costs, at around £150. Bursaries may be available for junior delegates. For more information the Eye’s Mind project, see http://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/research/neuroscience/theeyesmind/

AGEING BRAINS AND MINDS, AGEING SENSES AND SENTIMENTS:
LITERATURE, NEUROLOGY, PSYCHIATRY
May 26-27, 2016
Centre Universitaire de Norvège à Paris

The Bergen Literature and Science Research group invites scholars of the humanities, neurologists and psychiatrists to explore the phenomenology of the ageing self. This research seminar encourages topics that intrinsically connect especially literary texts on ageing and old age with the realms of neurology and psychiatry. It will allow us to study comparatively some physical and psychological aspects of ageing, as they are perceived through the lenses of medicine, literature (imaginative, autobiographical, reflective) and also visual media, in any historical period. While we do not expect literary scholars to be medically trained or neurologists and psychiatrists to be experts in literary critique, we do hope to enable a lively dialogue. In this way the event will give various responses to some inherent challenges in an interdisciplinary approach to ageing. How can fictions, images and testimonies of the ageing mind cohere with neurology's materialized conceptions of neuro-degeneration? How do the weakened senses of senescence affect sensitivity, and how is this rendered in our divergent discourses? What conceptual frameworks and critical tools can the humanities adopt to study ageing in synergy with the scientific approaches pursued by medicine and psychiatry?

Confirmed speakers will include:
Martine Boyer-Weinmann (Université de Lyon 2), "Amnesia, hypermnesia and hyper-aesthesia narratives"
Bernt Engelsen (University of Bergen), "The ageing self in an epileptological and neuropsychiatric and setting"
Jan Frich (University of Oslo), "Literary Myths about neuro-degeneration: The case of Huntington's disease"
Samuel Lepastier (Université de Paris Diderot)
George Rousseau (University of Oxford), "Ageing Brains, Jihadi Terrorists, and the black holes of Language"

The seminar language will be English.

Please send by February 15, 2016: a title and a short abstract (max. 200 words) including name, discipline and affiliation to Margery Vibe Skagen: margery.skagen@uib.no

Applicants will be notified of the committee's decision by March 1.

BSLS members are invited to submit items suitable for inclusion in this autumn’s Newsletter by Word attachment to jennihalpin@gmail.com. Please direct them to me by Tuesday, October 27. Notices referring to the past twelve months’ activities are welcomed.

I especially encourage you to send:

  • Notices of new books (including monographs and edited volumes) published by members;
  • Brief reports on science and literature events, seminars, conference panels, keynotes, and symposia organized by (or otherwise participated in by) members;
  • Funding awards in relevant areas;
  • Members’ completed PhDs (with note of title and awarding institution);
  • Festivals, exhibitions, public talks, media appearances, and other public engagement in the field by members; and
  • Forthcoming events to publicise, with CFPs, links, contact information, etc.

Be mindful that the Society broadly defines ‘science’ to include areas such as medicine and technology. Hold items under 250 words, please, and note that memberships should be up to date for items to be included in the Newsletter. For details of renewals please contact the Membership Secretary, Jessica Roberts (j.roberts@edu.salford.ac.uk).

 Gratefully, Jenni Halpin, Newsletter Editor