Articles by jholmes

You are currently browsing jholmes’s articles.

We are delighted to announce the launch of a new series of books entitled Explorations in Science and Literature, to be published by Bloomsbury. Here is the call for proposals:

Explorations in Science and Literature

We look forward very much to hearing your ideas for exciting new books in our field that speak to audiences across literary scholarship and the sciences.

John Holmes, Anton Kirchhofer and Janine Rogers (editors)

Here is the schedule for this term's seminars on Science, Medicine and Culture in the Nineteenth Century at St Anne's College, Oxford:

  • Wednesday 10 May 2017, 5.30 – 7.00 Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College.
    Professor Ursula Martin, University of Oxford - Ada Lovelace in her Mathematical Context
  • Wednesday 25 May 2017, 5.30 – 7.00 Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College.
    Dr James Emmott, Oxford Brookes University - On the Stratification of Language
  • Wednesday 7 June 2017, 5.30 – 7.00  Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College.
    Professor Oliver Zimmer, University of Oxford -  Time Tribes: How the Railways Made Communities (1840-1900)

For more details, click here.

2nd INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP IN THE FRAMEWORK OF “HERMOUPOLIS SEMINARS”,
SYROS, 5-8 JULY 2016
“Beyond Nature in Science and Literature”

The International Commission on Science and Literature DHST/IUHPST, the Hellenic Open University and the Institute of Historical Research/ National Hellenic Research Foundation organize a two-days’ workshop to study “Beyond Nature in Science and Literature”. The CoSciLit workshop is a new addition to the prestigious Hermoupolis Seminars which have been organized for more than 30 years every July on Syros Island.
This workshop follows the successfull 1st workshop organized in 2016 on the theme of "Nature(s), Humans and God(s) in Literature. Representations" and it will be part of series of workshops which will be organized with a specific theme every July.

The venue of the workshop will be the “Historical Archives of the State” in the Town Hall of Hermoulis. Hermoupolis was once the capital of Greece and a city of great cultural, scientific and industrial heritage. Syros Island is very close to Piraeus by boat and an ideal place for a high quality, inexpensive summer visit.

Those who are willing to participate in the workshop with a presentation may ask further information and/or submit an abstract of max. 200 words sending an email to gvlahakis@yahoo.com until 15 May 2016.

Languages: English, Greek, French, German

For participants giving a paper there will be a modest fee of 50 Euros and for those who will attend without a paper a fee of 40 Euros to cover administrative expenses. There will be some hotels with reduced prices on offer for the participants but there are plenty of places, in Hermoupolis or close by, at very convenient prices.
Coffee and refreshments will be offered.

Where Art and Science Meet: Art and Design at Oxford University Museum of Natural History (AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Award)

Level of Study: Doctoral research
Subject area: History of Art
Nationality: EU, UK
Type of Award: Research Council
Deadline for applying: 24/03/2017
Award Description
The Department of Art History, Curating and Visual Studies at the University of Birmingham, is delighted to offer one AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Award with the Oxford University Museum of Natural History. This Award offers you the opportunity to pursue a fully funded PhD in art history, natural history and museology.

This studentship is funded through the AHRC's Collaborative Doctoral Partnership scheme. Collaboration between a Higher Education Institution and a museum, library, archive, or heritage organisation is the essential feature of these studentships. This project will be supervised jointly by Dr Claire Jones and Professor John Holmes (University of Birmingham) and Professor Paul Smith (Oxford University Museum of Natural History) and you will be expected to spend time in both Birmingham and Oxford, as well as becoming part of the wider cohort of CDP funded students across the UK.

The closing date for applications is 5pm on Friday 24 March 2017. Interviews will take place at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History on Wednesday 5 April 2017.

For a full description of the project, and details of how to apply, click here.

 

 

Here are the details of this term's seminars in the Science, Medicine and Culture in the Nineteenth Century series at Oxford:

Wednesday 1 February 2017
Professor Barbara Taylor, Queen Mary University of London
Pathologies of Solitude
5.30 – 7.00, Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College
Drinks will be served after the seminar. All welcome, no booking required.
https://diseasesofmodernlife.org/category/events

**

Wednesday 22 February 2017
Dr Helena Ifill, University of Sheffield
Medical Authority, (pseudo)Science and the Explained Supernatural in Late Victorian Female Gothic Fiction
5.30 – 7.00, Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College.
Drinks will be served after the seminar. All welcome, no booking required.
https://diseasesofmodernlife.org/category/events

Scale of Nature: Long Nineteenth-Century Culture and the Great Chain of Being
One-Day Conference
Saturday 18 March 2017
Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies and Centre for Visual Arts and Culture
https://www.dur.ac.uk/cncs/conferences/scaleofnature/
CFP Deadline: Friday 25 November 2016
Durham University, UK
Keynote Address: Professor Peter Bowler (Queen’s University, Belfast)

CALL FOR PAPERS

Amongst the paradigms current in nineteenth-century culture the Great Chain of Being frequently held pride of place, vying against Darwinian approaches in what historian of science Peter Bowler described broadly as the ‘non-Darwinian revolution’. Arming scientists with a scale of nature - a fixed hierarchical arrangement of the natural world from the lowest rudimentary forms of life to its apogee in man – the Great Chain helped Victorian Britain reassert order and control in the face of perceived threats by the inherent randomness, chance and uncertainty of Darwin’s evolutionary theory. Paradoxically, in the battle between The Great Chain and Darwin, it was the Great Chain of Being that was frequently the fittest survivor. This one-day interdisciplinary conference examines this phenomenon, exploring Britain’s understanding of the Scale of Nature by investigating the Great Chain of Being in the context of the pre-, non- and post-Darwinian as well as Darwinian evolutionary culture in the long nineteenth century. It pays particular attention to visual representations of natural hierarchies.

We invite academic and institutional staff, postgraduates and other researchers to submit abstracts of 300 words for 20-minute individual papers, and 500 words for panels (three papers). Topics might include, but are not limited to:

• The history of The Great Chain as diversely and divergently reinterpreted by nineteenth-century figures
• Visual and spatial representations of The Great Chain of Being and competitor evolutionary ideas, as found in drawings, paintings, book illustration, cinema, photography, sculpture, architecture, museum design, exhibition and taxidermy spaces, and zoological gardens
• Implications for literary contexts, such as fiction, poetry, history and biography
• Its cultural influence in the arts more broadly, including evolutionary impacts in theatre, dance and music and other performance-related activities
Abstract Submission Information
Please send abstracts to Enya Doyle at cncs@durham.ac.uk by Friday 4 November 2016.
Confirmation of acceptances will be made by Friday 25 November 2016.

For more information, please contact Bennett Zon at bennett.zon@durham.ac.uk or
Ludmilla Jordanova at ludmilla.jordanova@durham.ac.uk

 

This year the Oxford University Museum of Natural History has been hosting a series of exhibitions, events and residencies under the theme Visions of Nature. In December, BSLS members John Holmes and Janine Rogers will be taking part in three public events at the museum as part of this celebration of art and poetry inspired by the natural world:

  • On 1st December (7-9 p.m.), John and Janine will be giving a joint talk entitled Building the Book of Nature, drawing on their research for their Canadian SSHRC-funded research project on natural history museum architecture. This talk will explore the architecture and art of the museum, including a guided tour and a pop-up exhibition of designs by John Ruskin, the Pre-Raphaelites and others.
  • On 7th December (6.30-8.30 p.m.), they will be joined by Stephen Wildman, Director of the Ruskin Library and Research Centre, together with researchers and teachers from Oxford, to discuss how science and art have worked together in visualising nature throughout the ages.
  • Finally, on 12th December (7-9 p.m.), John will be joining the museum’s three poets-in-residence, John Barnie, Steven Matthews and Kelley Swain (one-time BSLS Secretary), to launch a new anthology of poems inspired by and connected with the museum, entitled Guests of Time.

All three events are free and open to all. If you would like to reserve seats in advance, please click here.

The Commission on Science and Literature organized two events in the past summer. The workshop 'Nature, Humans and God(s)' was held on the island of Syros in Greece on 8-9 July. The 2nd International Conference on Science and Literature was held at Echophysics in Poellau, Austria, on 7-9 September. The proceedings of both meetings are to be published. In particular, the proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Science and Literature will be published by Living Editions, Austria.

We have decided that the Syros workshop should be the first of a series of seminars, each of which will have its own theme, to take place in the first week of July each year. The 2nd Syros workshop, which will have as its subject Beyond Nature in Science and Literature, will be held from 3-5 July 2017. Though relatively early, proposals for this Workshop are welcome. Our emails can be found on the contacts page of the CoSciLit website.

The 3rd International Conference on Science and Literature will take place in 2018, place and dates to be decided.

We would like also to remind you that we will be holding a symposium at the 25th International Congress of History of Science and Technology, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 23 to 29 July 2017. The deadline for abstracts is 5th November 2017.

Please send abstracts for the Rio Congress and proposals and enquiries regarding the 2nd Syros workshop to gvlahakis@yahoo.com.

Yours,

George Vlahakis, John Holmes and Kostas Tampakis

http://coscilit.eap.gr

This term there will be two seminars on Science, Medicine and Culture in the Nineteenth Century at Oxford:

Wednesday 19 October
Dr Andrew Mangham, University of Reading
'Have ye ever seen a child clemmed to death?': Elizabeth Gaskell and the Physiology of Starvation
5.30 – 7.00, Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College
Wednesday 9 November 2016 (Week 5)
Dr kitt price, Queen Mary, University of London
Psychic Dreams and Newspapers in the Late Nineteenth Century
5.30 - 7.00, Seminar Room 5, St Anne’s College

To read more details of the speakers, the series and the Diseases of Modern Life project, click here.

Cafe Culturel (run by students from Liberal Arts and Natural Sciences and Biomedical Sciences, at University of Birmingham) starts a new year of events. The first event in the new calendar, on Tue 18th October 2016, 6:30 pm, at Thinktank, Birmingham Science Museum, is workshop/cafe event with the title Cognitive Decline: Presentations and Representations. Starting from the current RSC production of King Lear (https://www.rsc.org.uk/king-lear/), a panel made up of a visual artist (Tom de Freston), a theatre critic (Prof. Russell Jackson) and a psychiatrist (Consultant Femi Oyebode) will present views and then engage in a discussion with the audience on the theme of how the various manifestations of cognitive decline are represented in various forms of art. The evening will comprise a short presentation from the members of the panel, which then will be followed by an extended questions and answers session, to which the public are invited to contribute. You can find more details and perspectives about the event on our Cafe Culturel blog: https://cafeculturelbirmingham.wordpress.com/, or you can contact Dr. Emil Toescu (e.c.toescu@bham.ac.uk); or check the Cafe facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Cafe.Culturel.Birmingham/.

And if you are interested in attending, please book your (free) ticket at https://cafeculturel_cognitivedecline.eventbrite.com. There are only a limited number of seats available, so please register if you are sure that you will be able to attend.

« Older entries