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BSLS Executive Committee Positions
Three positions on the BSLS Executive Committee will be either vacant or up for renewal in April: International officer (North America), Communications officer, and Member at Large. Present incumbents in two of the positions (Communications officer, and Member at Large) are seeking to continue in their roles, but all three posts are open to nominations.
Any member of BSLS is eligible for these posts and can propose themselves or someone else. Each proposed candidate will also need two nominations from members of BSLS, and these proposals and nominations should be sent to the Chair Martin Willis (WillisM8@cardiff.ac.uk) and myself, the Secretary (gjlynall@liverpool.ac.uk). Expressions of interest and proposals should be received by 2nd April at the very latest.
If you have questions about these posts, please do contact me, or any member of the committee. The sections of the Constitution relevant to this process are appended below.
Greg Lynall, Secretary
13 March 2017
[FROM THE CONSTITUTION]
4. OFFICERS
4.5 The membership of the Executive Committee shall be determined by elections held at the annual general meeting of the society. Members wishing to stand for election should be nominated by two members of the society before the start of the AGM. Where there is more than one candidate for any post, election shall be held by a ballot on the basis of a single transferable vote.
4.6 Members of the Executive Committee shall serve three-year terms of office.

University of Bristol, 6-8 April 2017

ONLY A FEW DAYS LEFT TO SUBMIT YOUR ABSTRACTS!

The twelfth annual conference of the British Society for Literature and Science will take place at the University of Bristol, from Thursday 6 April until Saturday 8 April 2017.

Keynote talks will be given by Professor Havi Carel (University of Bristol), Professor Robert Mitchell (Duke University), and Professor Ralph O’Connor(University of Aberdeen).

The BSLS invites proposals for twenty-minute papers, or panels of three papers, on any subjects within the field of literature and science.  Please send an abstract (c.200 words) and short biographical note to the conference organiser (Ros Powell bsls-2017@bristol.ac.uk) by no later than 5pm GMT, Friday 9 December 2016. Please see the full CFP at www.bsls.ac.uk

Merveilles Électriques

Invention littéraire, vulgarisation et circulation médiatique

Colloque international
Organisé par Claire Barel-Moisan (CNRS. ENS-Lyon. UMR IHRIM), Delphine Gleizes (Université Lyon 2. UMR IHRIM)

Les XVIIIe et XIXe siècles constituent une période essentielle dans l’histoire des découvertes sur le magnétisme et l’électricité. Elle se caractérise par l’élaboration d’hypothèses scientifiques viables, par la mise en place de procédures expérimentales à même de les étayer et, bien sûr, par le développement des applications techniques et pratiques qui en découlent : éclairage, énergie motrice, progrès dans les transmissions et les transports, etc. Ces découvertes dans le domaine des fluides modifient définitivement le rapport au monde. Par le caractère spectaculaire des expériences menées et des progrès engendrés, l’histoire de ces découvertes s’ancre également dans l’imaginaire contemporain, suscitant une production abondante de textes et d’images. Ce colloque se propose d’analyser la diversité des productions scientifiques, littéraires et médiatiques, dont la circulation témoigne de deux siècles de fascination pour les « merveilles électriques ».

16, 17 et 18 novembre : BU Lyon 1, MILC Lyon 2, et ENS Lyon

BSLS Winter Symposium

The Politics of Literature and Science

 

Queen’s Building, University of Exeter, NOW, DUE TO DEMAND, ON Saturday, 3 December, 2016

Organiser: Corinna Wagner & James Green (Department of English, Exeter University)

 

This BSLS Winter Symposium will explore relationships between politics, science, medicine, literature and visual culture. We will take ‘politics’ in both its broadest sense—considering for example, the politics of the body, the politics of scientific institutions, and how scientific and political discourse has shaped imaginative forms of expression (and vice versa). We will also take ‘politics’ in a more specific sense, to address how literary writers and artists actively intervened in specific medico-political debates, or how their novels, poems and plays acted as ‘mediums’ of scientific and political cross-pollination.

 

We would also like to invite papers that focus on the current field. What are the politics of researching and teaching in the field of literature and science? Contributors might want to reflect on engagement and collaboration, for example. The BSLS Winter Symposium will provide an opportunity for practitioners—artists, poets and novelists—and academics and theorists to share their methods and findings.

 

In terms of topics, contributors might consider how literary writers and artists raised and addressed scientific questions about, for instance:

  • medical treatments
  • the design of medical and scientific institutions
  • the collaborative or conflicting goals of scientists and governments
  • environmental policies and climate change issues
  • urban reform
  • social health reform policy
  • the uses of statistics and data
  • the scientific and political goals of empire
  • the application of science to issues of race
  • tropical medicine

 

One of the emphases of this one-day symposium will be the idea of trans-historical and transdisciplinary inheritance and exchange. What historical continuities exist between past and present? How might artists, writers and academics work together on the issues raised here?

 

Lastly, we particularly invite graduate students to participate in a ‘policy show &tell’: these are 10 minute slots in which each presenter suggests ways their own humanities research could address or attempt to solve a current medical/scientific/health problem.

 

Please submit short proposals to James Green on jag218@ex.ac.uk or Corinna Wagner on c.m.wagner@ex.ac.uk by 10 November, 2016

 

 

The Politics of Literature and Science

Queen’s Building, University of Exeter, Saturday, 12 November, 2016

Organiser: Corinna Wagner (Department of English, Exeter University)

 

This BSLS Winter Symposium will explore relationships between politics, science, medicine, literature and visual culture. We will take ‘politics’ in both its broadest sense—considering for example, the politics of the body, the politics of scientific institutions, and how scientific and political discourse has shaped imaginative forms of expression (and vice versa). We will also take ‘politics’ in a more specific sense, to address how literary writers and artists actively intervened in specific medico-political debates, or how their novels, poems and plays acted as ‘mediums’ of scientific and political cross-pollination.

We would also like to invite papers that focus on the current field. What are the politics of researching and teaching in the field of literature and science? Contributors might want to reflect on engagement and collaboration, for example. The BSLS Winter Symposium will provide an opportunity for practitioners—artists, poets and novelists—and academics and theorists to share their methods and findings.

In terms of topics, contributors might consider how literary writers and artists raised and addressed scientific questions about, for instance:

  • medical treatments
  • the design of medical and scientific institutions
  • the collaborative or conflicting goals of scientists and governments
  • environmental policies and climate change issues
  • urban reform
  • social health reform policy
  • the uses of statistics and data
  • the scientific and political goals of empire
  • the application of science to issues of race
  • tropical medicine

 

One of the emphases of this one-day symposium will be the idea of transhistorical and transdisciplinary inheritance and exchange. For instance, how did eighteenth- or nineteenth-century ideas about contagion, excess, monstrosity, materialism, rationality, waste, dirt, geography or geology migrate between scientific, political and literary realms? And, what are the legacies of this migration? What historical continuities exist between past and present?

Lastly, we particularly invite graduate students to participate in a ‘policy show &tell’: these are 10 minute slots in which each presenter suggests ways their own humanities research could address or attempt to solve a current medical/scientific/health problem.

Please submit short proposals to Corinna Wagner on c.m.wagner@ex.ac.uk by 31 October, 2016

In early July of 2017 the city of Newcastle will host a future of
the discipline of English conference called Shared Futures. As I announced at
the BSLS conference in April, we have been invited to put together a panel to
showcase the work of the Society. The committee feels that the very best way to
do this is to ask all of you – the members – to put yourselves forward to be
a part of that panel and to represent the Society to the wider discipline.
We are looking, therefore, for you to apply to us with an idea for a short
paper/presentation on your research that you think best exemplifies the current
state of the dynamic, interdisciplinary field of literature and science. We want
to involve members at all career stages, in any area of our discipline, to speak
with energy and engagement on their work.
We are also doing this with speed – so we wish to hear from you with your
proposed paper by Friday October 7th (yes, only a few days from now!). We will also
make our decisions very quickly, too.
We will be providing funds for those without permanent positions or access to
research funds to enable travel and accommodation, and there will be no
conference fee either. We would like a title and a brief 100-word description of
a paper that would take up a 10-minute presentation slot, and a few brief
details of your career stage and present position.
You can send these within an email direct to me at willism8@cardiff.ac.uk
I very much look forward to hearing from you. As I am sure you realise this is
both a unique event and a terrific opportunity to be part of the conversation
about the future of English studies.
With best wishes for the new academic year,
Martin Willis
BSLS Chair

EMPATHIES 2017

www.empathies2017.com

Jean Decety | Jackie Leach Scully | Jesse Prinz | Denise Riley

Call for Participation – Deadline: 10.12.2016

For a number of years now, empathy has been a central topic of public and academic debate and research. It is the subject of artistic, moral, and psychological reflections and commands interest from the humanities and hard sciences alike, often being a driving motor of knowledge production.

It is time to take stock and consider the heterogeneity and complexity of empathy, the values different societies and cultures have attached to it, and the various approaches that frame its investigations.

The SLSAeu Conference 2017 provides a cross-disciplinary platform for the discussions of the following interrelated subthemes: (1) Empathy, Morality, Ethics; (2) Empathy, Narrative, Imagination; (3) Empathy and the Nonhuman; (4) Collective Empathy.

We especially welcome abstracts that facilitate discussion of the synchronic (cultural) and diachronic (historical) diversity and differences in the manifestation of empathy.

Formats

To facilitate dialogue, we encourage proposals not only for formal paper sessions (4 speakers, 20-minute papers) but also for posters and, above all, roundtables. The typical roundtable (120 minutes) will include 6 or 7 presenters, including a moderator, who will each speak for 10 minutes, leaving ample time for exchanges with the audience. The roundtable participants should come from at least three different disciplines, preferably from science (incl. medical and technology fields), the humanities or social sciences, and the arts (literature, media, visual and performative arts). The roundtable may also focus on a book (fiction, philosophy, science etc.) or a specific controversial argument.

Anyone with a roundtable idea seeking like-minded presenters should first subscribe to the SLSAeu mailing list at https://www.maillist.unibas.ch/mailman/listinfo/slsa-eu and post there.

Online Submission

Please submit your proposal via the conference website: www.empathies2017.com

Contact

Manuela Rossini, Executive Director and President SLSAeu at: slsa-eu@unibas.ch

Special issue launch
Shakespeare: explorations over time and across disciplines
 

Palgrave Communications is a multi-disciplinary open access journal publishing peer-reviewed original research across all areas of the humanities & the social sciences.

To mark the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death, Palgrave Communications is pleased to announce the launch of a special issue on Shakespeare studies.

This special issue presents diverse scholarly perspectives that aim to illuminate academic thinking about Shakespeare, his writings, the social and political contexts that shaped him, as well the enduring cultural (and other) influences of his creative achievements to the present day.

Read all published papers in the collection:

http://www.palgrave-journals.com/palcomms/article-collections/shakespeare

Additional papers will be published in this collection over the coming months – sign up for our e-alerts to remain up-to-date:

http://www.palgrave-journals.com/nams/svc/myaccount/save/ealert?list_id=338

 

The University of Westminster's department of English is offering a fully-funded 3 year Full-Time PhD studentship on the topic of performing science in the nineteenth century. Full details can be found at https://www.westminster.ac.uk/courses/research-degrees/research-areas/social-sciences-and-humanities/research-studentships/performing-science-in-the-19th-century

BSLS member Sam George at Hertfordshire been involved in a collaboration with New York Botanical Gardens for an exhibition on Poetic Botany in the Eighteenth Century.

The exhibition can now be seen live at http://www.nybg.org/poetic-botany/.

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