University of Kent, 1-4 July

 Keynote Speakers

Maaike Bleeker, Utrecht University

Margrethe Bruun Vaage, University of Kent

Eric Clarke, Oxford University

Amy Cook, Stony Brook University   

 

Call for Papers

Organisers: Melissa Trimingham and Nicola Shaughnessy, in association with the Centre for Cognition, Kinaesthetics and Performance.

Building on the conferences associated with the network Cognitive Futures in the Humanities in Bangor (2013), Durham (2014) and Oxford (2015), Helsinki (2016) and Stony Brook (2017) the 2018 conference aims once again to bring together a wide array of papers from the cognitive sciences, philosophy, literary studies, linguistics, cultural studies, critical theory, film, performance, theatre and dance studies, the visual and sonic arts, musicology and beyond. In accordance with the original purpose of the network, the aims of the conference are:

to evolve new knowledge and practices for the analysis of culture and cultural objects, through engagement with the cognitive sciences;

to assess how concepts from the cognitive sciences can in turn be approached using the analytical tools of humanities enquiry (historical, theoretical, contextual);

to contest the nature/culture opposition whose legacy can be identified with the traditional and ongoing segregation of scientific and aesthetic knowledge.

Topics relevant to the conference include (but are not limited to): Cognitive neuroscience and the arts, Interdisciplinary methodologies, Cognitive poetics, Theory of mind, Conceptual blending, Cognition and narrative, Spectatorship and participation, Empirical aesthetics, The 4 Es, The science of creativity, The social mind, Material culture

Submission details

Please send 250-word proposals to  cogfutures@kent.ac.uk by 30 November 2017. As well as 20-minute papers, we welcome contributions in a variety of formats, for example workshops, performance presentations, and posters. Abstracts should be included as Word file attachments. Please indicate clearly in your email whether your abstract is to be considered for a paper or as part of a panel, including the name of presenter(s), institutional affiliation(s) and email address(es). Proposers can expect to hear if their abstract has been accepted by 5 January 2018, and registration will open soon afterward.

Organising committee

Shaun May, Nicola Shaughnessy, Melissa Trimingham, Freya Vass-Rhee

Cognitive Futures in the Arts and Humanities Steering Group

Amy Cook (Stony Brook University)

Karin Kukkonen (University of Oslo)

Peter Garratt (Durham University)

John Lutterbie (Stony Brook University)

Ben Morgan (University of Oxford)

Sowon Park (University of California, Santa Barbara)

Merja Polvinen (University of Helsinki)

Nicola Shaughnessy (University of Kent)

Registration now open for

2017: A Clarke Odyssey
A Conference Marking the Centenary of Sir Arthur C. Clarke
Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, UK
Saturday 9 December 2017

Keynote Speakers:
Stephen Baxter
Professor Charlotte Sleigh (University of Kent)

Sir Arthur C. Clarke is one of the most important British sf writers of the twentieth century – novelist, short-story writer, scriptwriter, science populariser, fan, presenter of documentaries on the paranormal, proposer of the uses of the geosynchronous orbit and philanthropist.

We want to celebrate his life, work and influence on science fiction, science and beyond.

Professor Charlotte Sleigh will open proceedings by looking at Clarke as an sf fan in the interwar years in London and how this intersected with his interest in science and its communication. Award-winning author Stephen Baxter will round out the event with an examination of Clarke’s non-fiction and how this positioned him as a significant public figure.

Our international conference speakers will address novels such as Childhood’s End2001: A Space Odyssey (book and film) and Imperial Earth, looking as issues such as transhumanism, Buddhism, terraforming and sexual politics. They will make connections to sf writers including Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, Olaf Stapledon and Liu Cixin, plus Star Trek. We will also discuss the Arthur C. Clarke Award.

Cost: Waged: £65
Unwaged and students £50
(Including lunch and refreshments)

 

https://2017aclarkeodyssey.wordpress.com/

Applicants for the NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology may be of any nationality and will have achieved distinction in the field of philosophy, history, religion, astrobiology, astronomy, planetary science, the history of science, paleontology, Earth and atmospheric sciences, geological sciences, ethics, or other related fields.

For more information, please go to http://www.loc.gov/loc/kluge/fellowships/NASA-astrobiology.html 

CALL FOR PAPERS

The thirteenth annual conference of the British Society of Literature & Science will take place at Oxford Brookes University, from Thursday 5 April until Saturday 7 April 2018.

Keynote talks will be given by Professor Kirsten Shepherd-Barr (University of Oxford), Professor Alex Goody (Oxford Brookes University).

The BSLS invites proposals for 20-minute papers, panels of three papers or special roundtables on any subjects within the field of science, and literatures in the broadest sense, including theatre, performance, film and television. There is no special theme for this conference but abstracts or panels exploring Frankenstein in its bicentenary year are especially welcome as are those in the contemporary period, theatre and performance.

In addition, we are hoping to put together sessions with looser, non-traditional formats, and would welcome proposals from any person or persons interested in making presentations of approximately ten minutes from notes rather than completed papers. Our hope is that the latter format will encourage longer Q&A sessions with more discussion. If you have a topic or research area which would suit such a discussion, we would also like to hear from you.

Please send an abstract (c.200-250 words) and short biographical note to the conference organiser, Dr. Carina Bartleet, c.e.bartleet@brookes.ac.uk, by no later than 5pm GMT, Friday 8 December 2017. Please include the abstract and biographical note in the body of the email and not in an attachment. All proposers of a paper or panel will receive notification of the results by the end of January 2018.

The conference fee will be waived for two graduate students in exchange for written reports on the conference, to be published in the BSLS Newsletter. If you are interested in being selected for one of these awards, please mention this when sending in your proposal. To qualify you will need to be registered for a postgraduate degree at the time of the conference.

Please note that those attending the conference will need to make their own arrangements for accommodation. Information on local hotels will be made available soon.

Membership: conference delegates will need to register/renew as members of the BSLS (annual membership: £25 waged/ £10 unwaged).

You are warmly invited to attend a symposium celebrating 70 years of applied social sciences work at the Tavistock Institute of Human Relations, and its distinctive contribution to the development of organisational research, business management studies and consultancy. The symposium takes place at the Conway Hall in central London on Thursday 19th October 2017. It is free to attend but booking is required and can be made as either a full day or a morning or afternoon session here.

 

The symposium forms part of a four day festival celebrating the 70th anniversary of the Tavistock Institute, which is taking place in central London from Tuesday 17th October to Friday 20th October. Full information can be found here on the festival website. These events also mark the launch of the Tavistock Institute’s Archive detailed here at: Wellcome Library. For information on accessing the Tavistock Archive, please take a library tour on Tuesday 17th October (book here) or Wednesday 18th October (book here). To see highlights from the Archive please visit the exhibition, ‘Past, Present & Future: From the Tavistock Institute Archive’, on display at the Swiss Church from 17th to 20th October (detailed here).

 

The Symposium:

The symposium will be opened by Cliff Oswick (Professor in Organisation Theory at Cass Business School; chair of the Tavistock Institute’s Council).

Two morning sessions follow: the first paper, ‘Sites of Selection’ will be presented by Daniel Monninger (Max Planck Institute, Cologne) and Dr Alice White (Wellcome Library); the second, ‘Community Development and Organisational Change: Large scale industrial action research in the 1970s’, will be presented by Elliot Stern (Fellow of UK Academy of Social Sciences; Emeritus Professor, Lancaster University; and Visiting Fellow, Bristol University; formerly Tavistock Institute) and Frances Abraham(Tavistock Institute).

 

The afternoon session will open with a keynote presented by the CEO of the Tavistock Institute, Dr Eliat Aram, ‘On Being an Orphan: An untold story’. It will close with a performance by Dreadlockalien (performance poet at University of Warwick 2015; Birmingham’s Poet Laureate 2005-6; host to BBC Radio 4’s Slam Poetry; and Director of ‘Colour Free Visions’, ‘New October Poets’, and ‘Write Down Speak Up’).

 

This term's speakers at the Oxford Science, Medicine and Culture in the Nineteenth Century seminars are Dr Helen Cowie (York), Prof Martin Willis (Cardiff) and Prof Kirsten Shepherd-Barr (Oxford). Here is the programme for the term:

Science, Medicine and Culture seminars

Reviews that have appeared on the British Society for Literature and Science website in September 2017

A list of books for which we are currently seeking reviewers can be found here.

Please email Gavin Budge on <G.Budge@herts.ac.uk> if you would like to propose a book for review  - anything published from 2015 onwards will be considered.

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Sound Talking workshop

SOUND TALKING

an interdisciplinary workshop on 'language describing sound / sound emulating language'

Friday 3 November 2017, Dana Research Centre, London Science Museum

Info and registration: bit.ly/SoundTalking

Sound Talking is a one-day event at the London Science Museum that seeks to explore the complex relationships between language and sound, both historically and in the present day. It aims to identify the perspectives and methodologies of current research in the ever-widening field of sound studies, and to locate productive interactions between disciplines.

Bringing together audio engineers, psychiatrists, linguists, musicologists, and historians of literature and medicine, we will be asking questions about sound as a point of linguistic engagement. We will consider the terminology used to discuss sound, the invention of words that capture sonic experience, and the use and manipulation of sound to emulate linguistic descriptions. Talks will address singing voice research, the history of onomatopoeias, new music production tools, auditory neuroscience, sounds in literature, and the sounds of the insane asylum.

Speakers:

- Ian Rawes (London Sound Survey)

- Melissa Dickson (University of Oxford)

- Jonathan Andrews (Newcastle University)

- Maria Chait (UCL Ear Institute)

- David Howard (Royal Holloway University of London)

- Brecht De Man (Queen Mary University of London)

- Mandy Parnell (Black Saloon Studios)

- Trevor Cox (Salford University)

For more information, visit bit.ly/SoundTalking or contact the workshop chairs:

Melissa Dickson <melissa.dickson@ell.ox.ac.uk>

Brecht De Man <b.deman@qmul.ac.uk>

THE STATE OF THE UNIONS

What are the relations between literature, science and the arts within our field today? This special double issue marks a unique collaboration between the Journal of Literature and Science and Configurations. The first instalment – JLS 10:1 – was published this year and can be read here. We now invite short papers for the second issue, to be published in 2018.

The aim of the double issue is to enable scholars of all career-stages to debate the nature of the interdisciplinary relations of our field in short and sharp “position” papers of approximately 2000 words. We welcome papers which respond directly to pieces published in JLS 10:1, but we also preserve a more general list of suggested topics from our original call:

1. The meanings of interdisciplinarity in the field
2. The place of the study of literature and science within the academy
3. International variations or international synergies
4. Collaborative work between literature/arts and the scientific community
5. How do we (now) define "literature" in the dyad of literature and science?
6. The relationship between cultural theory and historicism in the field
7. How is literature and science evolving in relation to its own splintering (into animal studies, neuroscience, environmental studies, etc.)?
8. Speculations: what is the future of the field?
9. Reflections: where has the field most profited and where has it gone astray?

The editors also particularly welcome discussion of any of the following with respect to the above topics:

 teaching and pedagogical practice
 material culture and book history
 the corporatization of the university
 the current crisis in the humanities and/or economic pressures on the sciences

Submission information for the second issue:
Length of contribution: 2000 words
Deadline: December 16th, 2017
Send to: Rajani Sudan (rsudan@mail.smu.edu) & Will Tattersdill
(w.j.tattersdill@bham.ac.uk)
(Decisions on inclusion in the second issue by February 2018)

JLS-and-Configurations-Joint-CFP-2

Reviews that have appeared on the British Society for Literature and Science website in August 2017

A list of books for which we are currently seeking reviewers can be found here.

Please email Gavin Budge on <G.Budge@herts.ac.uk> if you would like to propose a book for review  - anything published from 2015 onwards will be considered.

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