CFP

You are currently browsing articles tagged CFP.

International Conference: Institute for Germanic and Romance Studies, London, Thurs 2 – Fri 3 July 2009.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: Jacques Testart, Honorary Research Director of I.N.S.E.R.M;Fay Brauer, College of Fine Arts, University of New South Wales.

Difference, whether between individuals, whole populations or discrete organic species, has always been a source of fascination for mankind. The works of nineteenth-century pioneers such as Gregor Mendel and Hugo de Vries provided the basis for the modern science of genetics, which has sought not only to explain variation through projects such as the mapping of the human genome, but also to control it through the application of the techniques of eugenics and, latterly, of genetic engineering. This conference will aim to explore the impact and influence of genetic theories and related technologies in French and francophone intellectual and cultural life, with particular though not exclusive emphasis on literary and visual culture (including bande dessinée, plastic arts, cinema, TV, advertising) from the late nineteenth century to the present day, reflecting on some of the most controversial scientific and ethical questions in a corpus that embraces both the mainstream and the marginal. Suggested themes may include, but are not limited to:
· Transmission of hereditary illnesses / traits
· Cloning
· Hybridisation
· The creation of new species
· Mutants and mutation
· Teratology / dysmorphology
· Perfecting the individual / species
· Eugenics – public / private
· Genetic engineering and designer babies
· Biological utopias / dystopias
· Doctor / scientist as creator / author
· French philosophers and cultural historians and the life sciences (e.g. Henri Bergson, Georges Canguilhem, Michel Foucault)
· French genetic scientists and their engagement with culture (e.g. Jean Rostand, François Jacob, Jacques Testart)
· DNA technologies and theories of identity

The above list is in no way intended to be exhaustive, and proposals on the conference theme are invited in English or in French. Comparative perspectives are welcomed, though emphasis should be on the study of French-language sources.

Proposals (300 words maximum) for 20-minute papers should be sent to the conference organisers, Dr Douglas Morrey (d.j.morrey@warwick.ac.uk) and Dr Louise Lyle (l.lyle@sheffield.ac.uk ) by 31 January 2009.

Tags:

2009 is both the bicentennial of Charles Darwin’s birth and the 150th
anniversary of The Origin of Species. Victorian Studies will mark
the occasion with a special issue on “Darwin and the Evolution of
Victorian Studies.”

Since the publication of VS’s first Darwin issue in 1959, the study of
Darwin and the relationship of his life and work to Victorian culture
has become an industry. In the past twenty-five years alone we have
witnessed the publication of the first fifteen volumes of the Darwin
correspondence, Darwin’s 1836-1844 notebooks, major Darwin biographies
by Janet Browne and Adrian Desmond and James Moore, and important books
by such scholars as Gillian Beer, Bert Bender, Peter Bowler, Sandra
Herbert, George Levine, Ronald Numbers, Robert Richards, Rebecca Stott,
and Robert Young. In recent years, the study of Darwin has begun to take
new directions through examinations of Darwin’s writings beyond the
Origin and the Journal of Researches, investigations of Darwin’s
impact on previously overlooked areas (e.g., art and visual culture,
psychology and the emotions), and new approaches to Darwinism’s impact
on Victorian attitudes to gender and courtship, race and empire,
literature and publishing. The fact that Darwin’s complete writings and
5,000 pieces of his correspondence have been made available in
searchable online databases promises to open up Darwin scholarship even
further.

Where is the study of Darwin and Darwinism in Victorian culture heading?
This special issue will attempt to showcase work that pursues these new
approaches or offers even newer ones. I invite essays on all aspects of
Darwin and Darwin studies in the Victorian period from scholars working
in a range of areas, including history and history of science, literary
and cultural criticism, art history, and history of the book.

The deadline for submissions is July 15, 2008. Essays of not more than
8,000 words (including endnotes) should be prepared in MLA Style.
Submissions and inquiries should be sent directly to the issue’s guest
editor:

Jonathan Smith
Humanities Department
University of Michigan-Dearborn
4901 Evergreen Road
Dearborn, MI 48128
jonsmith@umich.edu

Tags:

DARWIN, TENNYSON and their READERS: A Bicentenary Celebration, 1809 – 2009
A One-Day Conference to be held in Cambridge,
Saturday 17th October 2009, 10am – 6pm.

Plenary Speakers:

Gillian Beer, George Levine
Offers of Short Papers (20 minutes long) are invited.

Please contact: Valerie Purton, Anglia Ruskin University (Valerie.Purton@anglia.ac.uk) by 1st October, 2008.

2009 will mark the bicentenary of the births of both Alfred Tennyson and Charles Darwin. Our one-day conference will celebrate this event by exploring the interaction of literature and science in the Victorian period, mining the rich vein of research opened up by Professor Dame Gillian Beer in Darwin’s Plots (1983) and continued by Professor George Levine in Darwin and the Novelists (1988). Professors Beer and Levine will both present plenary papers at the conference, outlining their latest thinking and building on the central insight that ‘the cultural traffic ran both ways’. Short papers are therefore invited, exploring the links not only between Tennyson and Darwin, but more generally between the writings of nineteenth century scientists and of nineteenth century poets or novelists – evidence that they were reading each other. A paper on Thomas Huxley’s reading of Tennyson would be especially welcomed; some more obvious subjects might be: George Eliot’s reading of Darwin; Darwin and Myth; Darwin reading Dickens; ‘Optimistic Materialism’ - in the light of George Levine’s latest book, Darwin Loves You (2007); ‘Condition of England novels and Evolutionary Theory: Kingsley, Disraeli and Darwin’; ‘Tennyson and Browning: two responses to evolutionary debates’; ‘Growing Younger with the Years: the reputations of Tennyson and Darwin reconsidered’; or ‘A Passion for Fabulation: Darwin, Tennyson and Autobiography’.

Proposals for papers, including a 300-word summary, should be sent to:

Dr Valerie Purton
Department of English
Anglia Ruskin University
East Road
Cambridge
CB1 1PT
U.K
Email: Valerie.Purton@anglia.ac.uk

Tags:

University of Manchester, UK

Today the sciences are linked to society through many different channels of
communication. The public interfaces with science during controversies that
involve scientists as well as journalists, politicians and the citizenry as
a whole. This interdisciplinary conference brings together diverse strands
of academia in order to consider science, technology and medicine as they
intersect with non-professional cultures in both contemporary and historical
settings.

The deadline for registration is Saturday 14 June.

For registration details and further information, see the conference
website, or email scienceandpublic@googlemail.com

Tags: ,

2009 is both the bicentennial of Charles Darwin’s birth and the 150th anniversary of The Origin of Species. Victorian Studies will mark the occasion with a special issue on “Darwin and the Evolution of Victorian Studies.�?

The study of Darwin and the relationship of his life and work to Victorian culture has become an industry. In the past twenty-five years alone we have witnessed the publication of the first fifteen volumes of the Darwin correspondence, Darwin’s 1836-1844 notebooks, major Darwin biographies by Janet Browne and Adrian Desmond and James Moore, and important books by such scholars as Gillian Beer, Bert Bender, Peter Bowler, Sandra Herbert, George Levine, Ronald Numbers, Robert Richards, Rebecca Stott, and Robert Young. In recent years, the study of Darwin has begun to take new directions through examinations of Darwin’s writings beyond the Origin and the Journal of Researches, investigations of Darwin’s impact on previously overlooked areas (e.g., art and visual culture, psychology and the emotions), and new approaches to Darwinism’s impact on Victorian attitudes to gender and courtship, race and empire, literature and publishing. The fact that Darwin’s complete writings and 5,000 pieces of his correspondence have been made available in searchable online databases promises to open up Darwin scholarship even further.

Where is the study of Darwin and Darwinism in Victorian culture heading? This special issue will attempt to showcase work that pursues these new approaches or offers even newer ones. I invite essays on all aspects of Darwin and Darwin studies in the Victorian period from scholars working in a range of areas, including history and history of science, literary and cultural criticism, art history, and history of the book.

The deadline for submissions is July 15, 2008. Essays of not more than 8,000 words (including endnotes) should be prepared in MLA Style. Submissions and inquiries should be sent directly to the issue’s guest editor:

Jonathan Smith
Humanities Department
University of Michigan-Dearborn
4901 Evergreen Road
Dearborn, MI 48128
jonsmith@umich.edu

Tags: ,

HSS 2008 Annual Meeting

Call for Papers
Pittsburgh, PA, USA
6-9 November 2008
(Joint meeting with PSA)

The History of Science Society will hold its 2008 Annual Meeting in Pittsburgh, PA in the Omni William Penn hotel (site of the 1999 annual meeting). Proposals for sessions, contributed papers, and, for the first time, posters, must be submitted by 1 April 2008 to the History of Science Society’s Executive Office. Papers that are part of a session are due no later than 8 April 2008.

All proposals must be submitted on the HSS Web site (http://www.hssonline.org) or on the annual meeting proposal forms that are available from the HSS Executive Office.

For more information, see the conference pages on the History of Science Society website: http://www.hssonline.org/meeting/2008HSSCFPPitt.html.

Tags: ,

HISTORY AND THE HEALTHY POPULATION: SOCIETY, GOVERNMENT, HEALTH AND MEDICINE
Annual conference of the Society for the Social History of Medicine www.sshm.org/

The Society for the Social History of Medicine 2008 Annual Conference will be jointly organised by the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare Glasgow, a research collaboration between Glasgow Caledonian University and the University of Strathclyde (www.gcal.ac.uk/historyofhealth) and the Centre for the History of Medicine at the Universityof Glasgow (www.arts.gla.ac.uk/History/Medicine/)

The conference will embrace all historical perspectives on the broad issue of how health has been defined and by whom. It will also consider the reasons that the various agencies involved in healthcare, including patients and communities, have adopted their approaches and strategies. The event is framed by reference to the generation of historians influenced by the idea that issues of health and healthcare are entangled in the projects of government, and seeks to engage with and critique 'governmentality' as a tool of analysis in the history of medicine.

The conference encourages papers from all periods and places in seeking a wide-ranging and
inclusive set of discussions.

Deadline for abstracts: 31 March 2008
To submit a title and abstract of no more than 300 words please contact Lydia Marshall
lmarshall@arts.gla.ac.uk.

Tags:

BEFORE DEPRESSION:
THE REPRESENTATION AND CULTURE OF DEPRESSION IN BRITAIN AND EUROPE, 1660-1800

A three-day conference
at The University of Northumbria at Newcastle and the University of Sunderland

June 19th to 21st, 2008
Plenary Speakers:
MADELEINE DESCARGUES-GRANT (Université de Valenciennes)
ELAINE HOBBY (University of Loughborough)
PETER SABOR (McGill University)

Call for papers

This conference seeks to explore further the phenomenon of depression 'before depression', and the problems that such an apparently retrospective construction might entail. The conference committee invites proposals on any aspects of the culture and representation of depression (however construed) in the period 1660-1800. Papers are acceptable in English or French.

Papers selected from the conference will be revised and published in The European Spectator/ Le spectateur européen.

Proposals of 200-300 words are invited, to be sent no later than Jan 31st, 2008, to Dr Clark Lawlor, Division of English, School of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Northumbria at Newcastle Upon Tyne,
Newcastle, NE1 8ST, United Kingdom

Proposals for papers in French should be sent to Valérie Maffre at the Université Paul-Valéry, Montpellier:
email valerie.maffre@univ-montp3.fr

For further information, please contact clark.lawlor@unn.ac.uk

Tags:

Abstracts are invited for a proposed panel on Scientists as Readers of Literature for the ‘Evidence of Reading, Reading the Evidence’ conference to be held at the Institute of English Studies, University of London, 21-23 July 2008. Papers may discuss the literary reading of scientists, natural philosophers or natural historians of any period. Please send 400-word abstracts and a brief biography to Alice Jenkins, a.jenkins_at_englit.arts.gla.ac.uk, by 20 January 2008. Any queries may also be addressed to Alice Jenkins at the above email address.

Tags:

Third Annual ‘Science & the Public’ Conference, University of Manchester, 21st and 22nd, June 2008

The past twenty years of scholarly study has demonstrated that science communication is a much more complex process than merely publishing in scientific journals and attending scientific meetings. Today the sciences are linked to society through many different channels of communication. The public interfaces with science during controversies that involve scientists as well as journalists, politicians and the citizenry as a whole. This intersection of science and the public raises many questions about the motivations of, and constraints on, actors involved in producing information about science for non-professional audiences. It also raises some fascinating questions about the nature, contexts and goals of the public communication of science from both a contemporary and historic perspective. This conference aims to bring together the wide ranging strands of academia that consider science as it intersects with non-scientific cultures.

Possible topics may include:

  • Patients and publics in health services
  • Notions of expertise in the public
  • Public science and science policy
  • Technological development and the public
  • Science communication theory in practice
  • News and entertainment media
  • Science on the internet
  • Science, technology and medicine in museums
  • Public interest and ‘the public interest’

We would particularly like to encourage those taking a critical approach to studying the public communication of technology and/or medicine to submit abstracts. The conference organizers also encourage full panel submissions and roundtable sessions on all topics related to the social, cultural, political, and ethical issues surrounding science & the public.

Panel proposals should include a panel abstract and individual abstracts for each of the papers on the panel as well as contact information (name, affiliation, email) of the presider (moderator) and all panel members. Individual paper proposals for a 20-minute presentation should submit an abstract (no longer than 300 words). Roundtable proposals should be a single abstract with names and contact information for all presenters.

All submissions should be emailed to scienceandpublic@googlemail.com by 14th March 2008. Please send enquires to this address as well.

Tags:

« Older entries § Newer entries »

css.php