In view of the recent university strikes in Britain, the BSLS and the conference organisers have made the decision to extend the CFP deadline for our annual conference. The new deadline is the 19th of this month! Full details of the conference, which will take place at Sheffield next year, can be found here.

The BSLS, its members, and the work they produce all suffer in various ways as a result of the casualisation, marketisation, and workload pressures against which the strike was set. If you would like to read more about the dispute, one place to start is here.

27 January 2020, Council Room, Trent Building, University of Nottingham

Emailnightingale2020@nottingham.ac.uk

Websitehttps://www.nottingham.ac.uk/Conference/fac-arts/Humanities/History/The-Home-in-History/index.aspx.aspx

Keynote speaker: Professor Jane Hamlett, Royal Holloway

CFP deadline: 22 November 2019

The University of Nottingham's AHRC-funded project 'Florence Nightingale Comes Home for 2020' (see www.florencenightingale.org) is arranging the second of a series of three thematic project workshops. Following the first successful event on nineteenth-century healthcare, this second workshop seeks to examine, from multiple disciplinary perspectives, the broad theme of 'Home' and its applicability as a prism through which to understand historical change.

'Home' is an elusive notion, lacking a permanent definition; it is a concept that is manifested through specific places and at specific times yet also transcends these. Edwin Heathcote, in The Meaning of Home (2012), wrote that homes are 'receptacles of both personal and collective memory, containers of meaning and symbol'. The history of the home unavoidably overlaps with histories of gender, work and architecture, geographies of mobility, and cultural and literary readings of concepts such as domesticity, the family, and privacy. In recent decades, these concepts have become fundamental to readings of modern social history, not least in the nineteenth century. For example, scholars use domesticity as a prism through which to investigate the history of public buildings, institutions and public spaces, alongside the Foucauldian paradigm of power and control. 

The case of Florence Nightingale demonstrates the richness and elasticity of the term ‘home’. Home for Nightingale meant variously a childhood sanctuary, a prison constraining women's energy, the object of sanitary reform, a communal place for nurses to live and study, a spiritual refuge, and the place one went to after death. These ideas will be explored in the forthcoming book Florence Nightingale At Home, to be published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2020.

While the team's focus is on nineteenth-century Britain, the workshop welcomes contributions from a range of periods and locations. Papers are invited from specialists in history, literature, geography, architecture, material culture, or other scholars with new/distinctive perspectives on the history and culture of the home.

Contributors are invited to address the following questions:

  • What has been the historical relationship between (ideas of) home and the built environment? How do changing uses of space, furniture and decoration reflect ideological/cultural/historical patterns?
  • What tensions can be observed between ideologies of domesticity on the one hand, and life in non-family based institutions on the other?
  • What has 'home' meant in such institutions as: hospitals, convents, boarding schools, asylums, military barracks, prisons, factories?
  • How have ideas of 'homeliness' been challenged/modified/subverted at different times?
  • How far is 'home' a useful concept for understanding national, cultural, or ideological histories?
  • How has home been represented and contested in literature and popular culture? To what extent have these depictions of home influenced other forms of discourse, for example health discourse?

Practical details

- An abstract of no more than 300 words along with a short (1-2 page) CV should be sent to Richard.Bates1@nottingham.ac.uk or nightingale2020@nottingham.ac.uk by Friday 22 November 2019.

- The workshop is fully funded as part of the AHRC Research Grant-funded project ‘Florence Nightingale Comes Home for 2020: an historico-literary analysis of her family life’, grant ref AH/R00014X/1. (www.florencenightingale.org)

- There will be no charge for attendance.

- Applications from PhD students and early career researchers are welcomed.

- A limited number of travel bursaries are available for travel within the UK. To apply, please include an estimate of your travel costs in your email application.

Agustí Nieto-Galan, Professor of History of Science at Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, sends word of a new call for participation in an edited volume on Flammarion in Latin America. The full call - in Spanish - is here.

The full programme for this year's Extinctions and Rebellions symposium - to take place on Nov 16th 2019 at the University of Liverpool - can now be downloaded here!

If you'd like to attend, tickets are still available. They are free, but you need to sign up at this link.

More details about our annual symposium can be found on this page.

Tuesday 29 October, 7-8.30pm
The Royal Institution, 21 Albemarle Street, London W1S 4BS

In autumn 1933, Albert Einstein found himself living alone in an isolated holiday hut in rural England. There, he toiled peacefully at mathematics while occasionally stepping out for walks or to play his violin. But how had Einstein come to abandon his Berlin home and go ‘"on the run"? Andrew Robinson tells the story of the world’s greatest scientist and Britain for the first time, showing why Britain was the perfect refuge for Einstein from rumoured assassination by Nazi agents.

For tickets (£7-16) and more info, please click here.

Wednesday 8th and Thursday 9th April 2020

Kelvin Hall, University of Glasgow, Scotland

https://phpiglasgow.wixsite.com/website | @phpi_glasgow

Deadline for abstracts: midnight Friday 29th November 2019

Public Health, Private Illness is a two-day interdisciplinary medical humanities conference for early career researchers and postgraduate students. 

We live in a climate of public health crises. Debates rage over the future of the NHS. Vaccination has become politicised. Concerns are mounting about emerging infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistance in an age of globalisation. At the same time, new ways of conceiving of health and illness at an individual level have emerged. Neoliberal policy focuses on individual risk and lifestyle interventions. Social movements like neurodiversity, mad pride or body positivity challenge medical discourses and rework difference as identity rather than pathology. 

We want to interrogate the public/private distinction within health, medicine and wellbeing, and to examine the many and complex intersections between public health ideals and the individual experience of health, illness, body and mind. We are particularly interested in debating marginalised and non-traditional perspectives on what can sometimes be a well-trodden debate.

Alongside panels, the conference includes a number of optional and less formal sessions on the conference theme. These include: a book-making workshop; a zine handling and discussion workshop, a creative writing workshop, and museum object-handling session, and a death cafe discussion. 

We are also hosting a poetry and fiction reading event on the Wednesday evening (venue TBC). This event is open to the public and will allow us to explore creative responses to the conference theme in a more informal, non-academic context. More information to follow soon for those interested in reading their work at this event.

Keynote Speaker: Dr Chisomo Kalinga, University of Edinburgh - ‘No man is an island’: Understanding Indigenous and African perspectives of personal wellbeing within Global Health Studies

Possible topics: We are open to proposals from a variety of backgrounds and time periods from scholars whose work concerns issues of health, illness, medicine and care. This includes cultural, literary, historical, linguistic, philosophical, theological and political approaches as well as practice-based responses to the theme and humanities work from within medical and veterinary science and practice. All approaches are welcome.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • public health campaigns and social health movements, including those which challenge medical discourses
  • conceptions of health, fitness and wellbeing
  • body, mind, and (inter)subjectivity
  • issues of conformism and resistance within medicine
  • health inequalities and stigma
  • nursing and other modes of care; the role of allied health care professionals
  • mental health, madness and psychological disorder
  • dying, death, hospice and end-of-life care

Abstracts: We welcome modes of presentation beyond conventional 20-minute papers including readings, performances, displays and posters as well as less formal 10-minute papers as provocations for discussion. Proposals for 20-minute papers or 10-minute provocations should include a 250-word abstract and a 100-word biography with contact information. Proposals for other formats should include a title, brief description and 100-word biography and contact details. Please do not feel constrained by the conventions of your discipline. All submissions and enquiries should be sent to PHPIGlasgow@gmail.com by midnight on Friday 29th November 2019.

Cost: This conference is free to attend. In addition, a limited number of travel bursaries are available. If you wish to be considered for a bursary, please include a 100-word justification with your proposal, outlining how you will be travelling to the conference and how attending is relevant to your studies/career. 

Venue: The conference will be held at Kelvin Hall in Glasgow’s West End, minutes away from the University of Glasgow. It is easily accessible: the Kelvin Hall travel guide includes detailed information about travel by bus, car, foot, bicycle, train and subway.

Accessibility: Kelvin Hall is fully wheelchair accessible. There is a hearing assistance system for the lecture theatre and step free access to the speaker's area. There is an onsite quiet room, a parents’ room and accessible changing room. Please view the Kelvin hall floor plan or the Accessable guide (which includes detailed information and photographs) for more information. Contact us at PHPIGlasgow@gmail.com if you would like to discuss your accessibility needs further.

Organisers: This conference is organised by the Medical Humanities ECR Group at the Medical Humanities Research Centre, University of Glasgow. It is generously funded by the University of Glasgow’s College of Arts and the British Society for Literature and Science.

Please direct any questions to PHPIGlasgow@gmail.com

The Centre for Global Knowledge Studies at the University of Cambridge are launching a new book series on Global Epistemics, published by Rowman & Littlefield International, in Cambridge on 29 October 2019. Follow the links to read more about the series and to book a place at the launch.

Interdisciplinary Science Reviews (https://www.tandfonline.com/loi/yisr20) will be publishing a special issue on Artificial Intelligence and its Discontents, edited by Colin Shunryu Garvey (Fellow, Human-Centered AI Institute, Stanford University). To read the call for papers, click below:

Next year's conference of the Commission on Science and Literature will be held in Girona in Spain on 2-4 July. Here is the preliminary call for papers:

CoSciLit 2020 Call for Papers

The fifteenth annual conference of the British Society for Literature and Science will be held at the University of Sheffield from Wednesday 15 April until Friday 17 April 2020.

Keynote speakers will be Dame Jocelyn Bell Burnell (Oxford), Professor Martin Willis (Cardiff), and Professor Angela Wright (Sheffield).

The BSLS invites proposals for 20-minute papers, panels of three papers, or special roundtables on any subjects within the field of science (including medicine and technology), and literatures in the broadest sense, including theatre, film, and television.

The conference will include a visit to the Alfred Denny Zoological Museum (pictured), and the Turner Museum of Glass will host a keynote lecture and the wine reception.

Please send an abstract (200 words) and short biographical note (50 words) to Katherine Ebury and Helena Ifill at shefbsls2020@gmail.com by no later than 18.00 GMT on Thursday 19th of December 2019 (please note that this is a new deadline, extended in view of the recent university strikes in Britain). Please include the abstract and biographical note in the body of the email.

The conference fee will be waived for two graduate students in exchange for written reports on the conference, to be published in the BSLS Newsletter. If you are interested in being selected for one of these awards, please mention this when sending in your proposal. To qualify you will need to be registered for a postgraduate degree at the time of the conference.

Information concerning registration fees and local hotels will be forthcoming.

Membership: conference delegates will need to register/renew as members of the BSLS (annual membership: £25 waged/ £10 unwaged).

« Older entries

css.php