Following the success of the JLS/BSLS essay prize in previous years, The JLS and the British Society for Literature and Science would like to announce the 2018 prize for the best new essay by an early career scholar on a topic within the field of literature and science.

Essays should be currently unpublished and not under consideration by another journal. They should be approx. 8,000 words long, inclusive of references, and should be send by email to both Josie Gill, Communications Officer of the BSLS (josie.gill@bristol.ac.uk), and Martin Willis, Editor of the JLS(willism8@cardiff.ac.uk), by 5pm on Friday, 31st August, 2018.

The prize is open to BSLS members who are postgraduate students or have completed a doctorate within three years of this date.

(To join BSLS, go to http://www.bsls.ac.uk/join-us/).

The prize will be judged jointly by representatives of the BSLS and JLS. The winning essay will be announced on the BSLS website and published in the JLS. The winner will also receive a prize of £100.

Read previous prize winning essays in the JLS: www.literatureandscience.org

CALL FOR PAPERS

Arts University Bournemouth

Frankenstein Unbound: An Interdisciplinary Conference Exploring Mary Shelley and Gothic Legacies

Dates: Wednesday 31 October and Thursday 1 November 2018

Venues: Conference - St Peter’s Church, Bournemouth

Keynote Speakers:

Sir Christopher Frayling, Chancellor, Arts University Bournemouth

Professor Elaine Graham, University of Chester

Professor Sir Peter Cook, CRAB Studios (TBC)

In 1849, Mary Shelley and Percy Shelley’s heart were brought to the graveyard of St. Peter’s Church in Bournemouth, where they were buried with the remains of Mary Shelley’s parents Mary Wollstonecraft and William Godwin.

In 2018, Arts University Bournemouth and St. Peter’s Church, in association with Bournemouth University, celebrate the bicentenary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s most famous work Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus (1818) as part of the Shelley Frankenstein Festival. The academic conference, located at this unique venue, will offer new and re-situated perspectives on Mary Shelley and her writings, her family and circle, and her most famous work. We are pleased to acknowledge colleagues at Bournemouth University for their organisational support.

We invite papers and presentations themed around, but not limited to, the following:

* Mary Shelley, Percy Shelley, and the Romantics

* Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley

* Mary Shelley beyond Frankenstein

* The Shelley family: history and legacy

* Monstrous Romantics

* Frankenstein and the sea

* Theology and Frankenstein

* Frankenstein and philosophy

* Frankenstein at home and abroad

* Adaptations and afterlives

* Frankenstein and medical humanities

* The abject and the sublime

* Frankenstein and emotion

* Guilt and crime in Frankenstein

* Interpretations of Frankenstein in the creative industries (Film, Art, Theatre, Dance, Writing etc)

* Mary Shelley and Gothic legacies

* Gothic architecture

* The Gothic imagination

We welcome proposals for themed panel sessions (maximum three papers), individual twenty-minute presentations, or creative submissions from practitioners and scholars of all fields. We particularly encourage submissions from post-graduate students and Early Career Researchers. Please submit an abstract (300 words) and short biography (100 words) to frankensteinunboundconference@gmail.com by Monday 18th June 2018.

For more information and updates visit our website: https://frankensteinunbound.wordpress.com/

The MDRN research lab at the University of Leuven (Belgium) is launching a new research programme on “Literary Knowledge, 1890-1950: Modernisms and the Sciences in Europe”.
Six competitive, full-time doctoral scholarships will be awarded within this programme supervised by Sascha Bru.
A call for applications can be found on:
The deadline for applying is 1 September.
We are looking forward to over 120 presentations at The Cognitive Futures in the Arts and Humanities conference at the University of Kent. The conference schedule and schedule of panel presentations are now online at our website:  https://research.kent.ac.uk/cognitivefutures2018/schedule-programme/
 
Registration Rates (3-day attendance, refreshments and lunch included):
 
Full rate
Delegates: £230.00
Students: £170.00
 
Daily rate: £80.00
 
For any queries contact cogfutures@kent.ac.uk
Reviews that have appeared on the British Society for Literature and Science website in May 2018

 

A list of books for which we are currently seeking reviewers can be found here.
Please email Gavin Budge on <G.Budge@herts.ac.uk> if you would like to propose a book for review  - anything published from 2017 onwards will be considered.

Tags: , ,

Expressions of interest are invited by 1 June in respect of the BSLS Winter Symposium in 2018. As members will remember, this is now a postgraduate and early career researcher-led event and presents a great opportunity to run a successful event at this stage in your career (with help and support from the BSLS Committee throughout the process).

Proposals are invited for a themed one-day event to take place in or about November, to be emailed to Rosalind Alderman at rsaa1v17@soton.ac.uk. As always, it is hoped that the event will have a 'non-conference' feel, and will include different types of papers, panels, and ways of sharing knowledge. Proposals should be no longer than two sides of A4, and should include a theme and description, details of the organising group and location, potential speakers (if known) and types of papers, panels or other sessions to be included.  The BSLS will award up to £500 in support of the symposium, which should be free to attend if possible.

Reviews that have appeared on the British Society for Literature and Science website in April 2018
A list of books for which we are currently seeking reviewers can be found here.
Please email Gavin Budge on <G.Budge@herts.ac.uk> if you would like to propose a book for review  - anything published from 2017 onwards will be considered.

Tags: , ,

Registration for the conference is now open and that it closes on the 1st May. The link to registration is here: https://mathematicsandmodernliterature.wordpress.com/register/

There is also a public event on the 3rd May inspired by the conference which is free of charge. It is called 'In Conversation with Emily Howard: Exploring Mathematics, Music and Literature', and includes a live performance from the Royal Northern College of Music's Mathias Quartet who will play some of Emily's compositions inspired by her collaborations with mathematician Marcus du Sautoy. The event also includes special guest Ursula Martin CBE FRSE FREng, Professor of Computer Science at The University of Oxford who will speak further about the mathematics behind these compositions. More details of the event can be found here: https://www.facebook.com/events/221960785220717/

For this term's Oxford Seminars on Science, Medicine and Culture in the Nineteenth Century, click below:

Science, Medicine and Culture seminars

Conference, Friday 8 June, Birkbeck, London

Experiment can describe both strict testing and speculative ‘trying out’, both proof and exploration; it can also refer to the process, the object, and the material apparatus of these activities. Experiment can have connotations of system or method, as is often prominent in the scientific context, or uncontrolled rule-breaking.

Literature’s relationship to experiment is similarly complex. David Seed has described Science Fiction as a kind of thought experiment, while Amanda Rees has emphasized not the genre’s plots or themes but its logical consistency, both drawing on the sense of rigour that experiment denotes. Struggling to stitch a chapter together, Laurence Sterne’s narrator Tristram Shandy suggests a less controlled process: ‘one would think I took a pleasure in running into difficulties of this kind, merely to make fresh experiments of getting out of ‘em’. In both of these cases, experiment is not only a process of attentive observation—the ‘empirical’ quality valued by many forms of writing—but a directing imaginative and textual force.

Bruno Latour describes experiment as a fundamentally literary technology, or ‘a text about a nontextual situation, later tested by others to decide whether or not it is simply a text’. This conference seeks to elaborate on the association between text and experiment, by examining experiment’s literary forms in the century leading up to the generic delineation of science fiction. As the practices, institutions, and rhetorics of natural philosophy transform through the long nineteenth century into self-identifying disciplines, what power does the notion of experiment exert? What impact did these reorganizations of knowledge have on the imaginative contours of experiment? How did experimental forms aim to facilitate new thoughts, sensations, ideas? In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Victor confesses an enabling moral suspension crucial to the horror genre: ‘During my first experiment, a kind of enthusiastic frenzy had blinded me to the horror of my employment’. Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species begins with an experiment as literary as it is scientific, explaining evolution by means of the analogy of variation in domestic pigeons. Emily Dickinson’s creation of a private herbarium resembles her ordered collection of her poems in bound ‘fascicles’, a similarity intimated in the floral illustration of the first edition of her Poems. Other experimental forms might be found in the relationship between abandoned experiments and literary fragments such as Coleridge’s partial ‘Theory of Life’, or in hybrid poetic forms which drew on and manipulated contemporary medical and scientific models of experimental knowledge.

How are we to understand experiment in these texts? This may refer to the techniques and styles of scientific writing, whether its desire to speak transparently or to inspire wonder, but also to the textures of experimental literature, which can draw on experiment’s exploratory nature to cultivate difficulty or confusion. In what sense ought we to think of texts—both scientific and literary—as experimental processes in their own right; not as artefacts that records methods or results, but as technologies that create them?

Speakers include:

former Chair of BSLS, Martin Willis (Cardiff)

with

Will Abberley (Sussex)

Jeremy Davies (Leeds)

Katherine Ebury (Sheffield)

Timothy Fulford (De Montfort)

Dahlia Porter (Glasgow)

Register via the Eventbrite page https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/experimental-forms-writing-science-and-medicine-in-the-long-nineteenth-century-tickets-44604422027

The programme of the conference will be available soon on http://www.cncs.bbk.ac.uk/. For more information please contact: C19@bbk.ac.uk

« Older entries

css.php