The next conference of the European Society for Literature, Science and the Arts, on the theme of SpaceTime, will be held in Athens on 25-18 June 2019. To read the cfp, click below:

SLSAeu2019CFP-4

Sleep and Stress, Past and Present

7th December 2018
9:00am—5:00pm
Kohn Centre, The Royal Society

Sleep and Stress Poster

A one-day interdisciplinary symposium in the Kohn Centre at the Royal Society, Sleep and Stress, Past and Present brings together expert scientists, medical practitioners, historians and literary critics to discuss the intersections between sleep and stress, both historically and in contemporary society. Prof Russell Foster (Head of the Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute, University of Oxford) will give the keynote lecture. Other speakers include: Prof Sally Shuttleworth (University of Oxford); Dr Tiffany Watts-Smith (QMUL); Dr Melissa Dickson (University of Birmingham); Prof Nick Franks (Imperial College London); Prof Clark Lawlor (Northumbria University); Prof Chris Fitzpatrick (University College Dublin); Prof Matthew Beaumont (University College London); Dr William Maclehose (University College London); and Prof Guy Goodwin (university of Oxford).

£30 delegate fee (£15 concessions) - please book here.
Sleep and Stress is being co-organised by the Royal Society and Diseases of Modern Life, University of Oxford

Please click through for links to the full CFP Beastly Moderisms and Call for Poems Beastly Modernisms

University of Nottingham, Humanities Building, Friday 11 January 2019, 10.00 – 16.00.

Keynote speaker: Professor Christine Hallett (University of Huddersfield)

This one-day workshop seeks to bring together researchers with an interest in the history and representations of healthcare, medicine, nursing, hospitals, and public health in the UK between 1800 and 1948, with a particular focus on local and regional histories.

Over the course of the nineteenth century, healthcare became increasingly organised, centralised and professionalised, paving the way for the reforms of the twentieth century leading to a national healthcare system. But this process was piecemeal and haphazard, often dependent on local and even individual initiatives. Hospitals were funded by local subscriptions; reforms such as the introduction of professional nurses, district nursing, and improvements to workhouse infirmaries occurred on a local basis, and spread only gradually.

As a result, the experiences of patients, nurses, doctors and other care practitioners differed significantly according to geographical location, as well as by class, wealth, and gender. This workshop seeks to highlight these local and regional differences and experiences in order to build up a more textured, nuanced picture of the development of healthcare in the industrial age.

This workshop is the first of a series to be held arising from the AHRC-funded project ‘Florence Nightingale Comes Home for 2020’, which examines the influence of Nightingale’s upbringing in the Midlands on her work and ideas. This first workshop invites contributions from a wide range of scholars in order to develop insights into broader histories of health and care in a regional perspective.

Possible themes for contribution include:
- How can localised studies of historical health and care contribute to a broader
understanding of the state of health and healthcare in the nineteenth and early
twentieth centuries?
- How did standards of, and access to healthcare vary according to regional
differences? How did patient experiences differ by region?
- How was healthcare delivered in the home? How did this differ from its delivery in
institutional environments? Were there significant overlaps between conceptions of
health at home and in institutions?
- How can studies of individual institutions, such as workhouse infirmaries, hospitals,
and nursing homes, contribute to broader regional and national histories of health?

- How did hospital nursing, district nursing and women’s involvement in healthcare
develop differently in different areas?
- How did connections and divisions between the rural and the urban inform
healthcare?
- How did representations of health vary across localities? How might we better
understand these regional cultures of health?

 

Practical details
- An abstract of no more than 300 words along with a short (1-2 page) CV should be sent to Nightingale2020@nottingham.ac.uk by Friday 16 November 2018.
- The workshop is fully funded as part of the AHRC Research Grant-funded project ‘Florence Nightingale Comes Home for 2020: an historico-literary analysis of her family life’, grant ref AH/R00014X/1.
- There will be no charge for attendance.
- A limited number of travel bursaries are available for travel within the UK. To apply, please include an estimate of your travel costs in your email application.

Victorian Light Night

Victorian Light Night: Being Human Festival 2018
Friday, 16th November 2018, 6-10.30pm - FREE - All Welcome!
Radcliffe Humanities courtyard
Join us for a fantastic late-night projection and sound show onto the original Radcliffe Infirmary in Oxford! Calling all families, couples, young peeps - everyone welcome to join in the Victorian Light Night Festival in the courtyard!
TORCH and researchers from the ‘Diseases of Modern Life' Project have teamed up with the award winning Projection Studio for a fantastic late-night projection and sound installation onto the original Radcliffe Infirmary in Oxford. Join us to see what the Victorians thought about the 'speed of life'....

There will be games, stalls, and performances by researchers throughout the night!
Refreshments available to purchase - hot drinks, snacks, alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks
This event is part of the Being Human Festival and Oxford Christmas Light Festival.
We are very grateful to all our collaborators and supporters, including the Maths Institute who will open up their building as part of the night's activities too!

For details, click here. Booking for free here.

The garden has long held a significant place in literary discourse, whether the natural garden in receipt books or herbals, for example, or the hypothetical garden, the biblical garden, or the lunar garden occasionally found in the fantastic voyages of the seventeenth century. The garden, too, has taken many forms, whether the cultivated garden, the meadow, the field or forest or the metaphorical garden. But the garden has also been a site for the practice of science, whether in grafting, herbal medicines, geographical purposes or as a site for ‘scientific’ conversations.

Whether the genre is poetry, drama or prose (non-fiction or fiction) this panel seeks to explore the literary context where both the garden and science intersect. Note that the garden ‘text’ here can also include art, history, and so forth. The context, however, is the intersection of science and the garden. The historical period also is open.

While the literary discourse of the western world offers a wide range of possibilities, papers dealing with the non-western European world, such as Africa, Asia, and Australasia are particularly welcome.

Prospective panelists should forward a proposal or abstract of about 250 words and a current vita by Friday, November 30, 2018 to jhayden@ut.edu. Panel Moderator:  Judy A. Hayden, PhD, Professor of English, University of Tampa, 401 West Kennedy Boulevard, Tampa, Florida 33604-1490.

Registration is now open for the symposium:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/bsls-winter-symposium-2018-tickets-52160049111

There is also a draft programme on the website.

Reviews that have appeared on the British Society for Literature and Science website in October 2018

 

A list of books for which we are currently seeking reviewers can be found here.

Please email Franziska Kohlt on <franziska.kohlt@bnc.ox.ac.uk> if you would like to propose a book for review  - anything published from 2017 onwards will be considered.

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CALL FOR PAPERS: ASLE-UKI BIENNIAL CONFERENCE 2019
4th to 6th September 2019, University of Plymouth
The University of Plymouth is delighted to be hosting the 2019 Biennial Conference of the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment, UK and Ireland.
Confirmed Plenary Speakers:
  • Greg Garrard (University of British Columbia)
  • David Higgins (University of Leeds)
  • Adeline Johns-Putra (University of Surrey)
  • Harriet Tarlo (Sheffield Hallam University)
While proposals on all and any aspects and periods of environmental literature are welcome, this year's theme is 'Co-emergence, Co-creation, Co-existence'. We invite proposals for individual (20-minute) papers, or pre-formed panels (90 minutes) which may comprise traditional panels of 3 or 4 papers, roundtables or paper jams with 6 or more speakers, or other innovative formats. We welcome proposals for creative contributions or creative-critical dialogues. The deadline for proposals is April 1st 2019.
Send proposals and queries to: asleuki2019@gmail.com
Visit the conference website at: https://www.plymouth.ac.uk/whats-on/asle

As genetic science develops at breakneck speed, cultural representations register in their form and content changing ideas about the self and personhood, consciousness, behaviour and motivation, heredity, and the boundaries of the human body. And yet, ‘western’ science is only one of a number of frameworks that provide explanations for these phenomena. Knowledge, assumptions and beliefs about what a gene is and what the human genome is, about inheritance, kinship, who owns the body, its parts and ‘data’, are not universal but are culturally produced, culturally interpreted, and culturally situated. For many indigenous communities, for instance, genes may be understood as ‘the ancestors within’ (Grace 1998), a perspective generating different philosophical questions from those raised by ‘western’ scientific frameworks about the make-up of the self and different ethical priorities regarding genetic research.

In this symposium we seek to bring together two recent currents in contemporary biocultural scholarship: a) critical engagement with the representation of ideas from genetic science in media and cultural texts; and b) the development of postcolonial approaches to biomedicine and the life sciences, which interrogate the cultural biases and structural inequalities inherent in these fields. We shall explore the representation of genetic discourse in literature, film, news media, popular culture and philosophy across cultures, and will pay particular attention to representations from the global South.

Topics for consideration may include, but are not limited to, the following:

* How creative works from around the world engage with scientific concepts of the gene, genomics, epigenetics, as well as related ideas including human variation, inheritance and ancestry;

* How genes, the human genome, heredity, and ownership of genetic information are conceptualised across different cultural frameworks;

* How cultural texts are both influenced by, and help to shape understandings of, genetic science;

* How cultural texts negotiate questions of identity (including race, disability, gender, sexuality, and species) in relation to genetics;

* Representations of genetic research, including its methodologies, dissemination, and ethics;

* Postcolonial/decolonial/indigenous approaches to the legal, ethical, regulatory, and market frameworks of the life sciences;

* The relationships between genre, form and genetic representations.

We welcome perspectives from disciplines including literary studies, film studies, history, law, media and cultural studies, critical and cultural theory, philosophy, postcolonial studies, critical medical humanities, disability studies, and bioethics. We are also keen to include participation from creative practitioners (writers, filmmakers, visual artists, performance artists) whose work engages with genetic science, and welcome proposals for creative sessions (film screenings, readings, performances, art exhibits).

Please submit 300-word proposals plus a short bio (100 words) to Clare Barker at c.f.barker@leeds.ac.uk. We also have a limited number of spaces for non-speaking participants; if you would like to attend please submit a short description (200 words max) of how the symposium relates to your field of research, creative or professional practice. The closing date for submissions is Friday 21 December 2018.

This symposium is part of a University of Leeds research project on ‘Genetics and Biocolonialism in Contemporary Literature and Film’ and is funded by a Wellcome Trust Seed Award [grant number 106839/Z/15/Z]. Attendance is free and catering will be provided for all delegates. Accommodation and travel expenses will be covered for all speakers.

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