University of Leeds

Registration is now open for "New Historical Perspectives on Ageing and the Life Course". This free two-day interdisciplinary conference at the University of Leeds, supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), will bring together speakers in the humanities and social sciences from Europe, America, and Asia to share new perspectives on the role and value of historical approaches to ageing.

We warmly invite all delegates to join us for the conference dinner at the venue at 7.30pm on Monday 19th March. Please sign-up via this link: http://signup.com/go/qJtwwyB

 

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/new-historical-perspectives-on-ageing-and-the-life-course-tickets-42048296587

29 June 2018, 10:00–18:00  

Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Boltzmannstraße 22, 14195 Berlin

 

The Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, in collaboration with the Institute for German and Dutch Philology and Friedrich Schlegel Graduate School of the Free University of Berlin, invites early career scholars to take part in the 13th Forum on Literature and Science History, also known as Studientag Literatur und Wissenschaftsgeschichte, which will be held on 29th June 2018, 10 am – 6 pm, at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science.

 

The Forum on Literature and Science History offers early career scholars an opportunity to discuss their work-in-progress themed on the history of literature and science, as well as other closely relevant topics. To maximize the impact of our discussion for participants, we especially encourage presentations of unfinished projects in various stages of development.

 

In this view, all accepted speakers will be requested to pre-circulate papers of 10-20 pages among all registered participants. The papers can be written in English or German. The discussion of all papers will start with comments by experts appointed by the organisers and followed by responses of the authors, each paper receiving about an hour of discussion time.

 

All interested early career scholars are warmly invited to apply for participation in the Forum by 31 January 2018 with a title, an abstract of up to 350 words of the proposed paper, and an indication of academic affiliation. Accepted speakers will be requested to confirm participation and pre-circulate their papers in PDF format by 3 June 2018.

 

Prof. Dr. Jutta Müller-Tamm, the Free University of Berlin

Dr. Donatella Germanese, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science

Prof. Dr. Christina Brandt, the Ruhr University of Bochum

Prof. Dr. Bernhard Kleeberg, the University of Erfurt

Dr. Johanna Bohley, the University of Jena

Dr. Jenny Willner, the University of Munich

Dr. Hansjakob Ziemer, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science

 

For registration please contact Lukas Nils Regeler: lukas.regeler@fu-berlin.de

Questions can also be directed to Maria Avxentevskaya: mavxentevskaya@mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de

For further information, see:

http://www.sf-foundation.org/node/233

Applications are now invited for the next round of both competitions, each with a deadline of 1st March 2018.

There will be three seminars in the Oxford University Science, Medicine and Culture in the Nineteenth Century series this term. For details, click below:

Oxford Seminars Spring 2018

Reviews that have appeared on the British Society for Literature and Science website in December 2017

A list of books for which we are currently seeking reviewers can be found here.

Please email Gavin Budge on <G.Budge@herts.ac.uk> if you would like to propose a book for review  - anything published from 2016 onwards will be considered.

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(Subject to Budgetary Approval)

The Department of English Literatures at Mount Allison University invites applications for a twelve-month position as the McCain Postdoctoral Fellow in Romantic & Regency Literature, with additional expertise in literature and the environment, eco-criticism, eco-poetics, or a related field. Candidates are required to have a PhD in English Literature and demonstrated expertise in Romantic & Regency Literature, and literature and the environment.  As this is a Teaching Fellowship, the ability to teach undergraduate courses in both these areas is an important asset.  The successful candidate will be asked to teach four 3-credit (one-term) courses in ENGL 2301: Literary Periods, 1800-present; ENGL 3451: Literature in the Age of Romanticism; ENGL 3461: Literature of the Regency; and ENGL 3951: Literature and the Natural World.

Mount Allison University, located in Sackville, New Brunswick, Canada is a small, primarily undergraduate university offering small classes and a residential experience to a diverse student population. It is consistently ranked as one of the best undergraduate universities in Canada and promotes research and teaching excellence.

The appointment will be made at the rank of Lecturer and will commence July 2018.  Candidates should prepare a letter of application, a complete curriculum vitae, a brief statement of teaching philosophy, and the names of three references. Applicants should arrange for the three confidential letters of support to be sent directly to the Search Committee.

All materials should be sent in electronic format to:

Chair of the Search Committee (McCain Postdoc),
Department of English Literatures,
Mount Allison University
62 York St., Sackville, NB, E4L 1E2
E-mail: english@mta.ca

The closing date for receipt of applications is March 10, 2018, or when the position is filled.  Candidates are responsible for ensuring that all applications materials, including letters of reference, reach the Department in time.

Mount Allison acknowledges, honours and respects the Mi’kmaw and Wolastoquyik (Maliseet) peoples, the historic inhabitants, custodians, and dwellers on the land where our university is built, and confirms its commitment to strengthen relationships with them. Mount Allison is committed to diversity and inclusiveness. We encourage applications from members of racialized communities, Indigenous persons, persons with disabilities, and persons of all sexual and gender identities. We seek candidates with qualifications and knowledge to contribute specifically to the further diversification of our campus community.

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens and permanent residents are given priority. Canadians and permanent residents should indicate their citizenship status in their application

 

 

Assistant Professor in Science, Culture, and Writing

Department of English Language and Literature

 The Department of English Language and Literature in the Faculty of Arts at the University of Waterloo invites applications for a probationary position in Science, Culture, and Writing at the rank of Assistant Professor, with a preferred start date of July 1, 2018. The successful candidate will have an established program of research in one of the following areas: ecocriticism; literature and the environment; science fiction studies; disability studies; literature of science; history of science; medical humanities; history of health and medicine; or an area of literary study relevant to the communication of science. A secondary area of research in writing, systems of knowledge production, new modes of publication, or other literary or rhetorical subfield, will be considered an asset. The Department promotes an integrated research culture, combining expertise in the fields of literary study, rhetorical study, and digital media.

For further information on this and other posts with a literature and science element visit: https://arts-ofas.uwaterloo.ca/english/

4-5 May 2018, University of Glasgow, Scotland, UK

Research into the so-called ‘gut-brain axis’ has seen extraordinary growth in the past decade as microbiologists, neurologists and nutrition scientists have discovered new ways in which these supposedly separate parts of the body interact. Whereas our guts, brains, nervous systems, and behaviour were thought to be distinct, increasing evidence shows that the boundaries between them are more porous. Both scientific and popular interest in the topic continues apace, with a constant stream of publications aimed at specialistand lay audiences, and the first international Gut-Brain Axis Summit taking place in San Francisco in December 2017.

Important work has also been undertaken on gastro-psychic connections by researchers from the history of medicine, literature and psychology, but so far, there has been little in the way of a coordinated, targeted contribution to the debate on the gut-brain relationship from the humanities and the social sciences.

This workshop will consider the value of cultural and historical perspectives on the relationship between the gut and the brain, an area of our lives that so emphatically crosses somatic, emotional and psychological experiences. The event will engage with this topic from a critical perspective, not only taking new approaches but also asking:

  • What are the risks or challenges involved in studying the gut-brain relationship from perspectives beyond the strictly biological or the clinical?
  • How can disciplines beyond science contribute to the understanding of this area of human experience? How does a humanities and social sciences approach differ from and / or enrich scientific research on the gut-brain axis?
  • What can a cultural and historical perspective on digestive health achieve?
  • How might different cultural understandings of the gut-brain relationship be communicated to scholars in the sciences, non-academic audiences, and public health practitioners and organisations?
  • Who might the audiences be for this form of research?

Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • The implications of categories such as race, class, age, or gender on understandings of the gut-brain relationship
  • Variations across nations and cultures in understanding the links between the gut and brain  
  • The history of the gut-brain relationship
  • Shifting definitions of ‘the gut’ and ‘the brain’ according to discipline, nation or time period
  • The construction of the gut-brain relationship through productions such as literature, the visual arts, and film
  • The ways in which links between the gut and the brain might  contribute to our understanding of what it is to be human

Contributions are invited from scholars in any area of the humanities and the social sciences, but preference may be given to papers focusing on the modern period (1800 to the present). Papers focusing on non-Western nations are strongly encouraged, as are proposals from postgraduate and early career researchers.

The confirmed keynote speaker for this event is Professor Elizabeth Williams (Oklahoma State University), who has published seminal articles on psycho-gastric conditions in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. She is currently completing a study of scientific and medical thinking about the appetite for food from the Enlightenment to the mid-twentieth century.

Proposals of 250 words for 15-20 minute papers, along with a 150-word biography, should be sent to manon.mathias@glasgow.ac.uk by 19 January 2018.

 

 

 

The BSLS Reviews site, <http://www.bsls.ac.uk/reviews/>, which publishes c 60 reviews a year, is looking for suitably qualified reviewers for some books that have come in recently, listed on <http://www.bsls.ac.uk/reviews/currently-seeking-reviewers/>. Reviews are c 1000w, and are generally due within three months.

If you are interested, please contact the Reviews Editor, Gavin Budge, on <G.Budge@herts.ac.uk>, with some details about yourself and your interests, and a postal address.

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