March 2014

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BSLS 2014 conference

The British Society for Literature and Science 2014 Conference will be taking place Thursday 10 to Saturday 12 April 2014, hosted at the University of Surrey. To see the programme, click hereFor information regarding getting to the University of Surrey, Stag Hill Campus please follow this link. The conference is taking place in the Lecture Theatre Block which is located at the heart of the University campus. If you have any questions or concerns please email FAHSevents@surrey.ac.uk.

Submissions for the British Society for Literature and Science and Journal of Literature and Science prize for the best new essay by an early career scholar on a topic within the field of literature and science are due by 12 noon on next Tuesday, 1st April, 2014. Essays should be currently unpublished and not under consideration by another journal. They should be between 6,000 and 8,000 words long, inclusive of references, and should be send by email to both John Holmes, Chair of the BSLS (j.r.holmes@reading.ac.uk), and Martin Willis, Editor of JLS (m.willis@westminster.ac.uk). The prize is open to BSLS members who are postgraduate students or have completed a doctorate within three years of this date. (To join BSLS, go to https://www.bsls.ac.uk/join-us/). The prize will be judged jointly by representatives of the BSLS and JLS.

The winning essay will be announced on the BSLS website and published in JLS. The winner will also receive a prize of £100. The judges reserve the right not to award the prize should no essay of a high enough standard be submitted.

To read the results of this year's essay prize, click here.

Kelley Swain, poet and one-time BSLS secretary, will be holding a public launch for Opera di Cera from 7 p.m. on 8th April 2014 at The Horseshoe, Clerkenwell Close, London. This new verse drama tells the extraordinary story behind the creation of the world-famous ‘anatomical Venus’ waxwork in 18th-century Florence. To read more about this fascinating and brilliantly original new work inspired by medical science, click here.

 

A reminder that the University of Reading is offering a PhD studentship based at the IRHS to study the relationship between zoology and literature in relation to the Cole Library of Early Medicine and Zoology. We welcome applications from students with backgrounds in either literature or biology or both. The studentship covers full fees and a bursary of £2000 per year. The project will begin in October, and the deadline for applications is 29th March. If you would like to apply for the studentship, or to recommend it to one of your friends or students, click here for more details:

Nature's Stories PhD

Applications are invited for BSLS small grants of up to £300 to advance and/or promote the study of literature and science. Examples of things for which the awards might be used are expenses for visiting speakers, seminar series and debates, and other funding to stage events on literature and science.  The scheme is not intended for individual conference travel, but applications to stage special BSLS panels at appropriate conferences (other than the BSLS 2014 conference) will be considered.

Applicants should be current members of BSLS and should apply by making a case, in up to 300 words, for how the award will contribute to the development of literature and science; a brief costing should be appended to the end of the application.  Where funding is sought for BSLS panels a clear indication of the scope of the panel, and of its contribution to the understanding of literature and science, should be included.  Recipients of small grants are asked to acknowledge BSLS sponsorship appropriately in publicity for events and to provide a brief report on events for the BSLS newsletter.

The application should be e-mailed, as a Word attachment, to the BSLS Treasurer, Daniel Cordle (daniel.cordle@ntu.ac.uk), by 7 April, 2014.   Applications will be considered by the BSLS Executive Committee.  Applicants may apply for any amount up to £300; in some instances a proportion of the amount applied for may be awarded.  Successful applicants will be informed by the end of May.

Queries about the scheme may be directed to Daniel Cordle, but no correspondence will be entered into about the decisions of the Committee.  International members of BSLS are welcome to apply for the awards, but should note that they will be distributed in the form of bank cheques made out in pounds sterling.  Serving members of the BSLS Executive Committee are not eligible to apply for the awards.

Recent and upcoming events supported by the scheme include the ‘Exhibiting Human Remains’ conference at the Hunterian Museum (June, 2013); a symposium, ‘Body and Mind: Mesmerism in Nineteenth-Century Culture and Literature,’ as part of the Damaging the Body seminar series (October 2013); a ‘Science as the Spark’ panel at the Cambridge Festival of Science (March 2014); and a talk on ‘What Scientists Read: How Does Literature Influence Scientific Thought and Practice?’ at Loncon 3, The 72nd World Science Fiction Convention (August 2014).

The first annual Fulcrum Southampton festival in March is a celebration of science and the arts, with performances, debate, and panel discussions between cultural figures, social commentators and scientists, with work from two of the UK’s most innovative theatre companies. Included in the programme are talks and debates covering everything from rickets to nostalgia and featuring, amongst others, Ben Goldacre, best-selling author, broadcaster, campaigner and medical doctor, Professor Tim Wildschutt, Senior Lecturer in Psychology at Southampton University, and comedian Robin Ince.

Sound&Fury will be performing Going Dark. Penny Dreadful will be presenting How to Be Immortal, three true stories linked by love and biology, starting with the woman whose cells grew for ever and ending with a piece of music literally written in human DNA. In Theatre will feature a presentation of work created by writer Ella Hickson and choreographer Ben Duke, developed from their meetings with Dr Helen Roberts, a specialist in geriatric medicine, and Tim Underwood, a stomach and throat cancer expert.
The final day of the festival will include TEDxSouthamptonUniversity, co-hosted by Nuffield, which will focus on what we can do to not only survive but to flourish.
For more information visit the Nuffield website: http://www.nuffieldtheatre.co.uk/whats-on/fulcrum-southampton#.UxdLkPl_uVP

A special issue of Interdisciplinary Science Reviews on Poetries and Sciences in the 21st Century has just been published. To take a look at it what covers, and to whet your appetite for the articles, click here.

Submissions for the British Society for Literature and Science and Journal of Literature and Science prize for the best new essay by an early career scholar on a topic within the field of literature and science are due in four weeks. Essays should be currently unpublished and not under consideration by another journal. They should be between 6,000 and 8,000 words long, inclusive of references, and should be send by email to both John Holmes, Chair of the BSLS (j.r.holmes@reading.ac.uk), and Martin Willis, Editor of JLS (m.willis@westminster.ac.uk), by 12 noon on Tuesday, 1st April, 2014. The prize is open to BSLS members who are postgraduate students or have completed a doctorate within three years of this date. (To join BSLS, go to https://www.bsls.ac.uk/join-us/). The prize will be judged jointly by representatives of the BSLS and JLS.

The winning essay will be announced on the BSLS website and published in JLS. The winner will also receive a prize of £100. The judges reserve the right not to award the prize should no essay of a high enough standard be submitted.

To read the results of this year's essay prize, click here.

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