October 2017

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Maritime Animals
Telling stories of animals at sea
 
 
Two-day international conference
National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London, UK
 
 
April 26-27, 2019
 
Keynote speakers
Thom van Dooren      
William Gervase Clarence-Smith
 
 
In maritime narratives of humans, ships and the sea, animals are too often absent, or marginalised in passing references, despite the fact that ships once carried, and were populated by, all kinds of animals. Horses, mules and other ‘military’ animals crossed the sea to their battlefields, while livestock were brought on-board to be killed and eaten. Sailors and passengers kept animal companions, ranging widely from cats and parrots to ferrets and monkeys. Animal stowaways, such as rats, termites and shipworms, did tremendous damage to ships’ structures and stores, especially during the age of sail. Rats also emerge from the archives as seafarers, ‘colonisers’ and explorers alongside their human counterparts. Moreover, countless animals – seabirds, dolphins, porpoises, etc. – would visit and accompany ships, filling many sea narratives with the wonder of oceanic animal encounters.
 
The conference seeks to shed fresh light on maritime history by placing animals centre stage. Papers are sought which uncover all aspects of animals’ involvements (and entanglements) with ships and their activities. For instance, what roles did animals play in famous maritime episodes? What were the experiences of animals on board ships, and to what extent is it possible to recover them?  In what ways were managing, sharing with, and caring for, animals important concerns of ships’ crews? What were the policies and procedures regarding keeping animals on board, and how did the presence of animals affect maritime practices?  Moreover, the conference will explore the impact of sea-faring animals – whether political, economic, cultural, or environmental – as maritime activities have knitted the world ever more closely together. What roles have animals played in colonial encounters and voyages of discovery, for instance? And how have animals functioned as cultural agents as well as commodities?
 
Liza Verity’s Animals at Sea (2004), a collection of animal photographs from the National Maritime Museum, has demonstrated that pets and animal mascots, affectionately regarded as shipmates, played a significant role in bringing a ship’s human community together. The conference will build on this book, while also going beyond a focus on the role of animals in mediating human shipboard communities to explore animal and human relationships at sea more widely. We call upon the power of story-telling to repopulate maritime history with animals, by telling, and listening to, surprising stories about them.
 
Papers are invited on (but not limited to) the following topics:
 
·         Methods for recovering the shipboard experiences of animals
·         Animals on-board ship (pets, ship’s mascots, vermin, livestock, etc.)
·         Animal explorers: animals and expeditions by sea
·         Animal sightings and encounters: sea birds, dolphins, and other animalvisitors
·         Politics and ethics of human-animal interactions at sea
·         Sea travellers’ tales: animal encounters in diaries, journals and ships’ newspapers 
·         Visual representations of maritime animals (paintings, carvings, scrimshaw, etc.)
·         Sailors as natural historians or zoologists at sea
·         Animals and animal products for trade
·         Ports and dockyard animal stories
·         Whaling, sealing and fishing
·         Ships and animal-borne disease
·         Animal shipwreck stories
·         Animals and ships’ technologies and structures
·         Environmental impact of animals travelling by sea
·         Ship ecology and interspecies relationships
·         Animal superstitions, stories and myths
·         Differing approaches to animals across global seafaring cultures
·         Animals at sea in literature
·         Maritime animals today
 
Please send a short abstract (200-300 words) for a 20 minute paper to Kaori Nagai (K.Nagai@kent.ac.uk ) by May 15, 2018. 
 
Call for stories
In relation to this conference, we are soliciting maritime stories and anecdotes from members of the public, as well as from writers, artists and scholars. If you have any interesting stories of animal encounters on ships or other memorable maritime animal stories, from oral history, the archives, or elsewhere, please drop a line to K.Nagai@kent.ac.uk ; we would be excited to hear from you. Also, we’d be grateful if you could forward this call for stories to those of your friends who have experience of life at sea. We are hoping to create an online forum to share your stories. 
 
 
Conference Organiser:
Dr. Kaori Nagai
School of English
University of Kent
CT2 7NX, UK

The Journal of Literature and Science http://www.literatureandscience.org is once again looking for reviewers to review various articles in the field of literature and science published in the last year to 18 months.

Please find below a number of articles that we would like to offer for review in the JLS. The list is by no means definitive; there’s such a lot of fascinating work out there, so please do let me know if there’s an article not on the list that you’d like to review.

It’s largely first come, first served, so do get in touch with an offer to do a specific article m.geric@westminster.ac.uk

Reviews should be 750 words long. For more details please follow the link: http://www.literatureandscience.org or contact Michelle m.geric@westminster.ac.uk to register your interest.

SUGGESTED ARTICLES

E. L. Johnson, “‘Life Beyond Life’: Reading Milton’s Areopagitica through Enlightenment Vitalism.” Eighteenth-Century Studies 49.3 (2016): 353-370.

Rachel Trubowitz, “Reading Milton and Newton in the Radical Reformation: Poetry, Mathematics, and Religion.” ELH 84. 1 (2017): 33-62.

E. K. Kelly, “‘Experience has not yet learned her letters’: Narrative and Information in the Works of Francis Bacon.” Configurations 24.2 (2016): 145-171.

Paul Gilmore, “Charles Brockden Brown’s Romance and the Limits of Science and History.” ELH 84. 1 (2017): 117-142.

Matthew Landers, “Anatomy, the Brain, and Memory in Tristram Shandy: A Forensic Examination of Sterne's Narrative Structure.” Configurations 25. 4 (2017): 397-414.

Gowan Dawson, “Dickens, Dinosaurs, and Design.” Victorian Literature and Culture 44. 4 (2016): 761-778.

Margaret S. Kennedy, “A Breath of Fresh Air: Eco-Consciousness in Mary Barton and Jane Eyre.” Victorian Literature and Culture 45. 3 (2017): 509-526.

Daniel A. Novak, “Caught in the Act: Photography on the Victorian Stage.” Victorian Studies 59. 1 (2016): 35–64.

Kate Holterhoff, "Egyptology and Darwinian Evolution in Conan Doyle and H. Rider Haggard: The Scientific Imagination." English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920 60. 3 (2017): 314-340.

Eleanor Dobson, “Gods and Ghost-Light: Ancient Egypt, Electricity, and X-Rays”. Victorian Literature and Culture 45.1 (2017): 119-35.

L. Wilhelm, “The Utopian Evolutionary Aestheticism of W. K. Clifford, Walter Pater, and Mathilde Blind.”Victorian Studies 59. 1 (2016): 9-34.

Tyson Stolte, “‘The Infinite within the Finite’: Victorian Prosody and Orthodox Theories of Mind.” Victorian Poetry 54. 3 (2016): 245-274.

Veronica Alfano, “Technologies of Forgetting: Phonographs, Lyric Voice, and Rossetti’s Woodspurge.” Victorian Poetry 55. 2 (2017): 127-161.

Matthew Rebhorn, “Billy’s Fist: Neuroscience and Corporeal Reading in Melville’s Billy Budd.Nineteenth Century Literature 72. 2 (2017): 218-244.

J.L. Lieberman & R. R. Kline, “Dream of an Unfettered Electrical Future: Nikola Tesla, the Electrical Utopian Novel, and an Alternative American Sociotechnical Imagery.” Configurations 25. 1 (2017): 1-27.

A. Caracheo, “The Measurement of Time: Mann and Einstein’s Thought Experiments.” Configurations 25. 1 (2017): 29-55.

Heather A. Love, “Cybernetics Modernism and the Feedback Loop: Ezra Pound’s Poetics of Transmission.” Modernism/Modernity 23. 1 (2016): 89-111.

Kirsty Martin, “Modernism and the Medicalization of Sunlight: D. H. Lawrence, Katherine Mansfield, and the Sun Cure.” Modernism/modernity 23. 2 (2016): 423-441.

Michael Allan, “Re-Reading the Arab Darwin: The Lewis Affair and Naguib Mahfouz’s Palace of Desire.” Modernism/modernity 23. 2 (2016): 319-340.

Joseph Darlington, “A Non-Euclidean Novel: Christine Brooke-Rose’s Such and the Space-Age Sixties.” Journal of Modern Literature 40. 2 (2016): 147-164.

Christopher D. Kilgore, “Bad Networks: From Virus to Cancer in Post-Cyberpunk Narrative.” Journal of Modern Literature 40. 2 (2016): 165-183.

We are delighted to announce that the British Society for Literature and Science and Journal of Literature and Science prize for an essay by an early-career scholar has been won by Kimberley Dimitriadis for her essay “Telescopes in the Drawing-Room: Geometry and Astronomy in George Eliot’s The Mill on the Floss”. We offer our congratulations to Kimberley for what the judges agreed was an outstanding and original essay. The essay will be published in the next available issue of JLS, and its author will also receive a prize of £100.

The judging panel wrote: “This year’s prize-winning essay was, in the view of the judges, a model example of the original research that literature and science scholarship can achieve. By offering an entirely fresh reading of George Eliot’s The Mill on the Floss, Dimitriadis has added a rich new perspective to an already very full critical view. Her rendering of that novel’s interrogation of Victorian astronomy showed a subtle understanding of the history of astronomical work in Britain in the mid-nineteenth century as well as an ability to see that work creatively transformed and reassessed through Eliot’s own particular interests in women’s education and contribution to knowledge.”

There was an exceptionally strong field this year and the judges were especially impressed by two other entries to which they would like to give honourable mentions: Catriona Livingstone for “Experimental Identities: Quantum Physics in Popular Science Writing and Virginia Woolf’s The Waves and Richard Fallon for “Literature Rather than Science: Henry Neville Hutchinson (1856-1927) and the Literary Borderlines of Science Writing”. The authors will be invited to submit their essays too for publication in JLS.

On Catriona’s essay the judges wrote: “This excellent reading of Virginia Woolf’s The Waves via quantum physics not only offers valuable insight into Woolf’s reading of popular physical texts of the period but also offers a method of understanding the relationship between literature and science as a feedback loop in which both disciplines inform one another. This balancing of methodological concerns with the specifics of a closely argued historicist reading is the essay’s strength, and the analysis of method that Livingstone offers is likely to be not only debated further but employed as a useful tool for thinking through the relationship between other texts, authors and sciences.”

On Richard’s essay the judges wrote: “This stylishly-written essay offered up some fascinating insights into Victorian debates on the categorisation of, and relationships between, science writing and popular science writing. As Fallon shows through a detailed case study of science populariser, Henry Neville Hutchinson, there were real concerns in scientific communities about what constituted science and what skills and practices were needed to be called a scientist. In revealing the contexts and specificities of these debates the essay tells us a great deal about the emerging relationship between literature and science and provides further nuance to our understanding of the two cultures.”

We would like to thank all the BSLS members who submitted essays for this year's prize. We were delighted by how many submissions we received and thoroughly enjoyed reading them. Between them, they covered a tremendous range of topics, from the early modern to the contemporary, with a broad range too of methods and approaches. Together, the articles admirably demonstrated the vibrancy of the literature and science community and its scholarship.

 

 

University of Kent, 1-4 July

 Keynote Speakers

Maaike Bleeker, Utrecht University

Margrethe Bruun Vaage, University of Kent

Eric Clarke, Oxford University

Amy Cook, Stony Brook University   

 

Call for Papers

Organisers: Melissa Trimingham and Nicola Shaughnessy, in association with the Centre for Cognition, Kinaesthetics and Performance.

Building on the conferences associated with the network Cognitive Futures in the Humanities in Bangor (2013), Durham (2014) and Oxford (2015), Helsinki (2016) and Stony Brook (2017) the 2018 conference aims once again to bring together a wide array of papers from the cognitive sciences, philosophy, literary studies, linguistics, cultural studies, critical theory, film, performance, theatre and dance studies, the visual and sonic arts, musicology and beyond. In accordance with the original purpose of the network, the aims of the conference are:

to evolve new knowledge and practices for the analysis of culture and cultural objects, through engagement with the cognitive sciences;

to assess how concepts from the cognitive sciences can in turn be approached using the analytical tools of humanities enquiry (historical, theoretical, contextual);

to contest the nature/culture opposition whose legacy can be identified with the traditional and ongoing segregation of scientific and aesthetic knowledge.

Topics relevant to the conference include (but are not limited to): Cognitive neuroscience and the arts, Interdisciplinary methodologies, Cognitive poetics, Theory of mind, Conceptual blending, Cognition and narrative, Spectatorship and participation, Empirical aesthetics, The 4 Es, The science of creativity, The social mind, Material culture

Submission details

Please send 250-word proposals to  cogfutures@kent.ac.uk by 30 November 2017. As well as 20-minute papers, we welcome contributions in a variety of formats, for example workshops, performance presentations, and posters. Abstracts should be included as Word file attachments. Please indicate clearly in your email whether your abstract is to be considered for a paper or as part of a panel, including the name of presenter(s), institutional affiliation(s) and email address(es). Proposers can expect to hear if their abstract has been accepted by 5 January 2018, and registration will open soon afterward.

Organising committee

Shaun May, Nicola Shaughnessy, Melissa Trimingham, Freya Vass-Rhee

Cognitive Futures in the Arts and Humanities Steering Group

Amy Cook (Stony Brook University)

Karin Kukkonen (University of Oslo)

Peter Garratt (Durham University)

John Lutterbie (Stony Brook University)

Ben Morgan (University of Oxford)

Sowon Park (University of California, Santa Barbara)

Merja Polvinen (University of Helsinki)

Nicola Shaughnessy (University of Kent)

Registration now open for

2017: A Clarke Odyssey
A Conference Marking the Centenary of Sir Arthur C. Clarke
Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, UK
Saturday 9 December 2017

Keynote Speakers:
Stephen Baxter
Professor Charlotte Sleigh (University of Kent)

Sir Arthur C. Clarke is one of the most important British sf writers of the twentieth century – novelist, short-story writer, scriptwriter, science populariser, fan, presenter of documentaries on the paranormal, proposer of the uses of the geosynchronous orbit and philanthropist.

We want to celebrate his life, work and influence on science fiction, science and beyond.

Professor Charlotte Sleigh will open proceedings by looking at Clarke as an sf fan in the interwar years in London and how this intersected with his interest in science and its communication. Award-winning author Stephen Baxter will round out the event with an examination of Clarke’s non-fiction and how this positioned him as a significant public figure.

Our international conference speakers will address novels such as Childhood’s End2001: A Space Odyssey (book and film) and Imperial Earth, looking as issues such as transhumanism, Buddhism, terraforming and sexual politics. They will make connections to sf writers including Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, Olaf Stapledon and Liu Cixin, plus Star Trek. We will also discuss the Arthur C. Clarke Award.

Cost: Waged: £65
Unwaged and students £50
(Including lunch and refreshments)

 

https://2017aclarkeodyssey.wordpress.com/

Applicants for the NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology may be of any nationality and will have achieved distinction in the field of philosophy, history, religion, astrobiology, astronomy, planetary science, the history of science, paleontology, Earth and atmospheric sciences, geological sciences, ethics, or other related fields.

For more information, please go to http://www.loc.gov/loc/kluge/fellowships/NASA-astrobiology.html 

CALL FOR PAPERS

The thirteenth annual conference of the British Society of Literature & Science will take place at Oxford Brookes University, from Thursday 5 April until Saturday 7 April 2018.

Keynote talks will be given by Professor Kirsten Shepherd-Barr (University of Oxford), Professor Alex Goody (Oxford Brookes University).

The BSLS invites proposals for 20-minute papers, panels of three papers or special roundtables on any subjects within the field of science, and literatures in the broadest sense, including theatre, performance, film and television. There is no special theme for this conference but abstracts or panels exploring Frankenstein in its bicentenary year are especially welcome as are those in the contemporary period, theatre and performance.

In addition, we are hoping to put together sessions with looser, non-traditional formats, and would welcome proposals from any person or persons interested in making presentations of approximately ten minutes from notes rather than completed papers. Our hope is that the latter format will encourage longer Q&A sessions with more discussion. If you have a topic or research area which would suit such a discussion, we would also like to hear from you.

Please send an abstract (c.200-250 words) and short biographical note to the conference organiser, Dr. Carina Bartleet, c.e.bartleet@brookes.ac.uk, by no later than 5pm GMT, Friday 8 December 2017. Please include the abstract and biographical note in the body of the email and not in an attachment. All proposers of a paper or panel will receive notification of the results by the end of January 2018.

The conference fee will be waived for two graduate students in exchange for written reports on the conference, to be published in the BSLS Newsletter. If you are interested in being selected for one of these awards, please mention this when sending in your proposal. To qualify you will need to be registered for a postgraduate degree at the time of the conference.

Please note that those attending the conference will need to make their own arrangements for accommodation. Information on local hotels will be made available soon.

Membership: conference delegates will need to register/renew as members of the BSLS (annual membership: £25 waged/ £10 unwaged).

You are warmly invited to attend a symposium celebrating 70 years of applied social sciences work at the Tavistock Institute of Human Relations, and its distinctive contribution to the development of organisational research, business management studies and consultancy. The symposium takes place at the Conway Hall in central London on Thursday 19th October 2017. It is free to attend but booking is required and can be made as either a full day or a morning or afternoon session here.

 

The symposium forms part of a four day festival celebrating the 70th anniversary of the Tavistock Institute, which is taking place in central London from Tuesday 17th October to Friday 20th October. Full information can be found here on the festival website. These events also mark the launch of the Tavistock Institute’s Archive detailed here at: Wellcome Library. For information on accessing the Tavistock Archive, please take a library tour on Tuesday 17th October (book here) or Wednesday 18th October (book here). To see highlights from the Archive please visit the exhibition, ‘Past, Present & Future: From the Tavistock Institute Archive’, on display at the Swiss Church from 17th to 20th October (detailed here).

 

The Symposium:

The symposium will be opened by Cliff Oswick (Professor in Organisation Theory at Cass Business School; chair of the Tavistock Institute’s Council).

Two morning sessions follow: the first paper, ‘Sites of Selection’ will be presented by Daniel Monninger (Max Planck Institute, Cologne) and Dr Alice White (Wellcome Library); the second, ‘Community Development and Organisational Change: Large scale industrial action research in the 1970s’, will be presented by Elliot Stern (Fellow of UK Academy of Social Sciences; Emeritus Professor, Lancaster University; and Visiting Fellow, Bristol University; formerly Tavistock Institute) and Frances Abraham(Tavistock Institute).

 

The afternoon session will open with a keynote presented by the CEO of the Tavistock Institute, Dr Eliat Aram, ‘On Being an Orphan: An untold story’. It will close with a performance by Dreadlockalien (performance poet at University of Warwick 2015; Birmingham’s Poet Laureate 2005-6; host to BBC Radio 4’s Slam Poetry; and Director of ‘Colour Free Visions’, ‘New October Poets’, and ‘Write Down Speak Up’).

 

This term's speakers at the Oxford Science, Medicine and Culture in the Nineteenth Century seminars are Dr Helen Cowie (York), Prof Martin Willis (Cardiff) and Prof Kirsten Shepherd-Barr (Oxford). Here is the programme for the term:

Science, Medicine and Culture seminars

Reviews that have appeared on the British Society for Literature and Science website in September 2017

A list of books for which we are currently seeking reviewers can be found here.

Please email Gavin Budge on <G.Budge@herts.ac.uk> if you would like to propose a book for review  - anything published from 2015 onwards will be considered.

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