June 2019

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At 7.00 pm on Sunday 7th July in the Levi Fox Hall Edward’s Boys will give their first performance of Wit and Science by John Redford prior to touring Oxford, London and Genoa, Italy where they will perform at the invitation of the Société Internationale pour l’étude du Théâtre Médiéval.

Redford, composer, organist and choirmaster of St Paul’s Cathedral, seems to have written the play around 1540. It exists in one manuscript in the British Library. Part comic allegory and part satire on education, and including four songs, Wit and Science is important for several reasons: it spawned imitations and sequels; it is a rare example of an English ‘school play’; and it tells us something about how a Tudor schoolmaster understood his educational project. 

Performances

Sunday 7th July, 7.00pm – Levi Fox Hall CV37 6BE
Tickets: £10; Concessions: £5

Monday 8th July, 6.00pm – The Chapel. New College, Oxford OX1 3BN
Tickets: £10; Concessions: £5

Tuesday 9th July, 7.00pm – the Priory Church of the Order of St John, Clerkenwell, London EC1V 4JJ
Tickets: £12; Concessions: £6

Tickets for performances may be purchased by means of the online Box Office https://www.ticketsource.co.uk/kes

Friday 12th July, 7.00pm for the Société Internationale pour l’étude du Théâtre Médiéval at the Palazzo Ducale di Genova, Italy

The Journal of Literature and Science http://www.literatureandscience.org is once again looking for reviewers to review various articles published in the last year to 18 months in the field of literature and science.

Please find below a number of articles that we would like to offer for review for the Journal’s forthcoming 2019 Winter issue. Its largely first come, first served, so do get in touch with an offer to review a specific article by emailing Michelle Geric m.geric@westminster.ac.uk

I would also be very happy to receive suggestions for other relevant articles for review that aren’t listed below – please do let me know.

Reviews should be 750 words long. For more details please follow the link: http://www.literatureandscience.org or contact Michelle m.geric@westminster.ac.uk to register your interest.

SUGGESTED ARTICLES:

Sandra Robinson. “Databases and Doppelgängers: New Articulations of Power.” Configurations 26. 4 (2018): 411-440. 

Valerie O'Brien. “‘A Genius for Unreality’: Neurodiversity in Elizabeth Bowen's Eva Trout.” Journal of Modern Literature 42. 2 (2019): 75-93.

Lorenzo Servitje. “Of Drugs and Droogs: Cultural Dynamics, Psychopharmacology, and Neuroscience in Anthony Burgess’s A Clockwork Orange.” Literature and Medicine 36. 1 (2018): 101-123.

Kurt Beals, “‘Do the New Poets Think? It's Possible’: Computer Poetry and Cyborg Subjectivity.” Configurations 26. 2 (2018): 149-177. 

Ursula K Heise. “Science Fiction and the Time Scales of the Anthropocene.” ELH 86. 2 (2019): 275-304.

Jocelyn Rodal. “Patterned Ambiguities: Virginia Woolf, Mathematical Variables, and Form.” Configurations 26. 1 (2018): 73-101.

Christy Rieger. “Chemical Romance: Genre and Materia Medica in Late-Victorian Drug Fiction.” Victorian Literature and Culture 47. 2 (2019): 409-437.

Pascale McCullough Manning. “The Hyde We Live In: Stevenson, Evolution, and the Anthropogenic Fog.” Victorian Literature and Culture 46. 1 (2018): 181–99.

Katja Jylkka, “‘Witness the Plesiosaurus’: Geological Traces and the Loch Ness Monster Narrative.” Configurations 26. 2 (2018): 207-234.

Thomas M. Stuart, “Out of Time: Queer Temporality and Eugenic Monstrosity.” Victorian Studies 60. 2 (2018): 218-227.

Larsen, Haley. “‘The Spirit of Electricity’: Henry James's In the Cage and Electric Female Imagination at the Turn of the Century.” Configurations 26. 4 (2018): 357-387. 

Elisavet Ioannidou. “Neo-Victorian Visions of the Future: Science, Crime, and Modernity.” Victoriographies 8. 2 (2018): 187-205. 

Mary Kuhn, “Dickinson and the Politics of Plant Sensibility.” ELH 85. 1 (2018): 141-170.

Doreen Thierauf. “Tending to Old Stories: Daniel Deronda and Hysteria, Revisited. Victorian Literature and Culture 46. 2 (2018): 443-465.

Sara Brio. “The Shocking Truth: Science, Religion, and Ancient Egypt in Early Nineteenth-Century Fiction.” Nineteenth-Century Contexts 40. 4 (2018): 331-344.

John Rogers. “Newton's Arian Epistemology and the Cosmogony of Paradise Lost.” ELH 86. 1 (2019): 77-106. 

Alexander Jakobidze-Gitman. “The Rise of Machines in Reformation Nuremberg: Jakob Ayrer's ‘Fastnachtspiel of Fritz Dölla with His Bewitched Fiddle’.” Configurations 26. 4 (2018): 441-469. 

I would also like to draw the attention of potential reviewers to the recent issue of Literature and Medicine which is themed “Chemistry, Disability, and Frankenstein” (volume 36, no. 2, 2018). Please do get in touch if there is an article from this issue that you would like to review.

Word follows of a fundraising campaign which is not officially connected to the BSLS, but in which BSLS members might be interested:

Charles Lyell (1797 - 1875) is well known for his part in the Darwinian evolutionary debates, his travels to America and his role in convincing readers of the significance of 'deep time'. During the past decade, Lyell's geographical theory of climate and his subdivisions of recent geological periods have gained renewed attention in connection with discussions of climate change and the Anthropocene. The Lyell archive is almost certainly the most important manuscript collection relating to nineteenth century science still in private hands.  At its core are 294 notebooks, which provide a daily record of Lyell's private thoughts, reading notes, travels, field observations and conversations from the mid-1820s to his death half a century later.

In order for the family to meet inheritance tax, the Lyell notebooks were sold to an unknown foreign buyer towards the end of last year. Fortunately, the UK government has imposed a temporary export ban to enable fundraising to purchase these remarkable documents, conserve them, and make them available on-line for free to the public. The University of Edinburgh Library, which already has the largest collection of Lyell material, is organizing the campaign. The website for this became active at the end of last week. The sum required is £1,444,000; major donors have already pledged more than a third of the total needed.

The temporary export ban has an initial deadline of 15th July, so time is extremely short.  If significant progress is made, then it may be extended until 15th October. Therefore, all who are interested are asked to pledge a donation, which will only be collected when the required amount is achieved. For more information about the notebooks and to make a pledge, please click on https://www.ed.ac.uk/giving/save-lyell-notebooks/pledge-to-save/

If you, your students and friends can give anything to this campaign--even five pounds or a pound--it will make a big difference, not least in showing larger donors that there is substantial public interest and concern. It would be great if we can get the donor count over 1000.

I'd appreciate it if you could pass on this message to anyone who might be interested, and to any other relevant lists.

Jim Secord (jas1010@cam.ac.uk)
Professor of History and Philosophy of Science
Director, Darwin Correspondence Project
University of Cambridge

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