Articles by bsls

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This special issue of Modern and Contemporary France, edited by Daniel A. Finch-Race and funded in part by the BSLS small grants fund, has just been published online.

The contents are:

Editorial
Hopes and Fears in Times of Ecological Crisis across the francosphère
Daniel A. Finch-Race
99-114
www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09639489.2021.1907323

Articles
A Flat Past? History, Environment, Topography, and Medicine
Keir Waddington
115-29
www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09639489.2020.1868416

George Sand's Volcanic Imagination
James Illingworth
131-43
www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09639489.2020.1826416

Elemental Ecocritique of Normandy's Industrial-Era Coast in Zola's La joie de vivre
Daniel A. Finch-Race
145-63
www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09639489.2021.1895734

Coal Politics: Receiving Émile Zola's Germinal
Arthur Rose
165-78
www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09639489.2020.1793747

Remembering Disaster and Ecologies of Affect in Nina Bouraoui's Le jour du séisme (1999) and Nathacha Appanah's Le dernier frère (2007)
Beatrice Ivey
179-92
www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09639489.2021.1888904
(Open Access)

Spectres of 'Development': Francophonie, Agricultural Coloniality and Genocide Memory in Scholastique Mukasonga's La femme aux pieds nus and Inyenzi, ou Les cafards
Frances Hemsley
193-208
www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09639489.2020.1849079

Documenting Hurt: UN, Epistemic Injustice, and the Political Ecology of the 2010 Cholera Epidemic in Haiti
Kasia Mika
209-26
www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09639489.2020.1810646

Reviews
Gauguin's Challenge: New Perspectives After Postmodernism
Belinda Thomson
227-28
www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09639489.2021.1874321

Montmartre: A Cultural History
Constance Bantman
228-29
www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09639489.2021.1911972

De cendres et de braises
Daniel A. Gordon
230-31
www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09639489.2020.1826417

‘Imagining a Post-Pandemic: Coronavirus Narratives and Histories of the Future’ | Wednesday 16th June 2pm | Online

The Commission on Science and Literature DHST/IUHPST is holding the last of its series of monthly virtual open lectures on “Literature and the Pandemics in Historical Perspectives” to date this week. The lecture will be given by Prof Martin Willis, Cardiff University, on the title ‘Imagining a Post-Pandemic: Coronavirus Narratives and Histories of the Future.’ Join the lecture here.

These lectures are hosted by the M.Sc. program “Science Communication” of the Hellenic Open University and they are jointly organised with the University of Birmingham.

George Vlahakis and John Holmes, CoSciLit President and Secretary.

The Department of English at Durham has announced a call for its new lecture series, to be held online. Abstracts for 45 minute papers or panels addressing the theme of "Past, Present, and Future" should be sent to latesummerlectures@gmail.com by May 30th 2021. Full details of the call are on this poster!

4th and 5th Lectures
Commission on Science and Literature DHST/IUHPST

The Commssion on Science and Literature DHST/IUHPST is very glad to announce the continuation of its ongoing series of monthly virtual open lectures on “Literature and the Pandemics in Historical Perspectives” to be given by distinguished scholars in the field. The fourth and fifth lectures are as follows:

19th MAY 14.00 UK Time (15.00 CET / 16.00 Greek Time)
Prof Pablo Mukherjee, University of Warwick
Refusing to get better: (Post-)Colonial Vaccines
https://hou.webex.com/hou/j.php?MTID=m28dbbf6e37ba94909d9b3c3a3c512dbf

16th JUNE 14.00 UK Time (15.00 CET / 16.00 Greek Time)
Prof Martin Willis, Cardiff University
Imagining a Post-Pandemic: Coronavirus Narratives and Histories of the Future.
https://hou.webex.com/hou/j.php?MTID=me93e08e1acf0e532f3f38d0b0857aef3

The virtual lectures are hosted by the M.Sc. program “Science Communication” of the Hellenic Open University and are jointly organized with the University of Birmingham.

George Vlahakis and John Holmes, CoSciLit President and Secretary

The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, is holding an exhibition of Pre-Raphaelite drawings and colours from 18 May - 20 June.

The exhibition features drawings and watercolours by Pre-Raphaelites such as Dante Gabriel Rossetti and John Ruskin, which will be of interest to some of the BSLS's members. Tickets are available from today! Full information here.

3rd Lecture
Commission on Science and Literature DHST/IUHPST

The Commission on Science and Literature DHST/IUHPST is very glad to announce a series of virtual open lectures on “Literature and the Pandemics in Historical Perspectives” to be given by distinguished scholars in the field. The third lecture is as follows:

21st APRIL  14.00 UK Time (15.00 CET) (16.00 Greek  Time)
 Dr Lukas Engelmann, University of Edinburgh:

 The Outbreak Narrative in the Science of Epidemics: Plague, AIDS and Covid-19

Dr. Lukas Engelman is a historian of medicine, Chancellor’s Fellow and Senior Lecturer in the School of Political and Social Sciences at the University of Edinburgh. Recently, with Dr. Christos Lynteris, he published the book Sulfuric Utopias, MIT Press, 2020.

https://hou.webex.com/hou/j.php?MTID=m8579a328a8d02d257bb6e30fc196b363

The virtual lectures will be given at 14.00 UK Time  (15.00 CET). They will be hosted by the M.Sc. program “Science Communication” of the Hellenic Open University and they are jointly organized with the University of Birmingham.

George Vlahakis and John Holmes, CoSciLit President and Secretary

You can access the conference on this page!

To do so, you will need to be a BSLS member and logged in.

Hosted by Sheffield, this online conference runs from 9am - 3pm, 19 May 2021. The registration deadline is 19 April. Full details are on the attached PDF.

Dear BSLS Members,

The Journal of Literature and Science http://www.literatureandscience.org is once again looking for reviewers to review various articles published in the last year to 18 months in the field of literature and science.

Please find below a number of articles that we would like to offer for review. It's largely first come, first served, so do get in touch with an offer to review a specific article by emailing Michelle at m.geric@westminster.ac.uk

I would also be very happy to receive suggestions for other relevant articles for review that aren’t listed below – please do let me know.

Reviews should be 750 words long. For more details, please follow the link: http://www.literatureandscience.org or contact me at gericm@westminster.ac.uk to register your interest.

SUGGESTED ARTICLES:

Donovan E. Tann, “Experimental Science and Speculation in Cavendish’s Convent of Pleasure.” Studies in English Literature 1500-1900 60. 3 (2020): 463-483.

Paul Giles, “‘By Degrees’: Jane Austen’s Chronometric Style of World Literature.” Nineteenth-Century Literature 75. 3 (2020): 265–293.

Barbara Barrow, “‘Shattering’ and ‘Violent’ Forces: Gender, Ecology, and Catastrophe in George Eliot’s The Mill on the Floss. Victoriographies 11. 1 (2021): 38-57.

Voskuil, “Victorian Plants: Cosmopolitan and Invasive.” Victorian Literature and Culture49. 1 (2021): 27-53.

Wells, “Proserpina Unbound: John Ruskin, Maria La Touche, and Victorian Floriculture.” Victorian Literature and Culture48. 4 (2020): 633-663.

Diana Rose Newby, “Bleak Environmentalism: The Science of Dickens's Weathered Bodies.” Texas Studies in Literature and Language 62. 2 (2020,): 178-202.

Rae X. Yan, “Robert Louis Stevenson as Philosophical Anatomist: The Body Snatcher.” English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920 62. 4 (2019): 458-481.

Nathaniel Otjen, “Energy Anxiety and Fossil Fuel Modernity in H.G. Wells's The War of the Worlds.” Journal of Modern Literature 43. 2 (2020): 118-133.

Caleb Fridell, “The Extractive Logic of Fossil Capital in H. G. Wells's Scientific Prophecy.” Modern Fiction Studies 66. 1 (2020): 164-189. 

Gregory Tate, “Evolution, Idealism, and Individualism in May Kendall's Comic Verse.” English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920 63. 3 (2020): 429-451. 

Richard Fallon, “Arthur Conan Doyle's The Lost World: Illustrating the Romance of Science.” English Literature in Transition 1880-1920 63. 2 (2020): 162-192

Lauren Cameron, “Infertility and Darwinian Anthropology in Anthony Trollope’s Phineas Novels.” Studies in English Literature 1500-1900 59. 4 (2019): 893-912. 

Michael Thomas Gaffney, “The Birth of the Ice Age: on Narrative and Climate History in the Nineteenth Century.” Nineteenth-Century Contexts 42. 5 (2020): 567-580.

Mark Celeste, “The “bond of the sea”: Conrad, Coal, and Entropy.” Nineteenth-Century Contexts 42. 5 (2020): 509-522.

Ida Marie Olsen, “Outlines of Ecological Consciousness in W. H. Hudson's Environmentalism.” English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920 63. 2 (2020): 193-210. 

Elspeth Green, “I. A. Richards Among the Scientists.” ELH 86. 3 (2019): 751-777. 

Paola Villa, “Mollusk-Writers: Spacetime Revolutions in a Literary Shell.” Journal of Modern Literature 43. 2 (2020): 21-40. 

Peter Balbert, “From Relativity to Paraphrenia in D.H. Lawrence's ‘The Man Who Loved Islands’: Speculations on Einstein, Freud, Gossamer Webs, and Seagulls.” Journal of Modern Literature 43. 2 (2020): 60-79. 

Justin Prystash, “Leaning from the Human: Virginia Woolf, Olaf Stapledon, and the Challenge of Behaviorism.” Configurations 28. 4 (2020): 433-457. 

Kevin Hart, “‘Nondescript Specimens’: Herbert Spencer's Social Theory in Ulysses.” James Joyce Quarterly 57. 3 (2020): 319-335..

Madeleine Chalmers, “Living as we Dream: Automatism and Automation from Surrealism to Stiegler.” Nottingham French Studies 59. 3 (2020): 368-383.

Yanfang Tong, “Memory as Imagination: Mind Science in Bellow's Short Fiction.” Interdisciplinary Literary Studies 22. 3 (2020): 240-261.

News reaches us of a research position which has become available at Lancaster. The deadline for applications is 15 March, pay £28,331-32,817pa. Full details here.

"You will have a PhD in Literature or History concentrating on the eighteenth and/or nineteenth centuries. Direct experience with eighteenth- and/or nineteenth-century manuscripts is desirable, as are publications on or in a field related to eighteenth- and/or nineteenth-century literature and/or science. Previous editorial experience, particularly previous work on a scholarly edition, would be an advantage as would previous experience on a Digital Humanities project especially one that has applied TEI (Text Encoding Initative) Guidelines. While experience with TEI would be an advantage, full training will be given in the role. There is a specific focus on contexts of slavery and colonialism in one part of the project, as well as more general links to the fields of literature and science and the history of science in the whole project. You will use social media to promote the project and find new audiences for the transcriptions."

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