Articles by bsls

You are currently browsing bsls’s articles.

Friday 10 May 2019
9:15-16:45
University of Bristol – 10 Woodland Road
#EnviroMedicalHumanities

This free conference will feature eight papers by early-career researchers and a keynote by Professor Keir Waddington (@keir_waddington).

On the following day, Saturday 11th, five of the speakers will be at the University of Bristol's School of Modern Languages to deliver masterclasses for teachers and pupils.

These activities are supported by the Institute of Modern Languages Research at the University of London (@IMLR_News), the Association for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France (@asmcf), the British Society for Literature and Science (@TheBSLS), and the Centre for Environmental Humanities at the University of Bristol (@UoBrisCEH).

You are welcome to register on Eventbrite for as much of the programme as you like:
www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/enviro-medical-approaches-to-modern-francophone-culture-tickets-60885766968.

9:15, Welcome
Dan Finch-Race

9:30, Panel 1 James Illingworth (Exeter) – George Sand's Volcanic Imagination
Sarah Jones (Oxford) – Zola: Medicine and Madness
Arthur Rose (Bristol) – Coal Politics: Receiving Émile Zola's Germinal

*11:00, Break

11:30, Keynote Keir Waddington (Cardiff) – A Flat Past? History, Environment, Topography and Medicine

*12:30, Lunch break

13:30, Panel 2 Joseph Ford (IMLR) – Towards an 'Environmental Ethic' in the Literary Writing of Albert Camus
Beatrice Ivey (Stirling) – Remembering Natural Disasters with Nathacha Appanah and Nina Bouraoui
Holly Langstaff (Oxford/Warwick) – 'Une mouche importune': Reading Insects in Maurice Blanchot

*15:00, Break

15:30, Panel 3 Frances Hemsley (Bristol) – Health and Environment in 'New' Rwandan Testimonial Literature
Kasia Mika (Amsterdam) – Cholera Chronotopes: Living in and through 'the Time of Cholera'

16:30, Closing remarks
Dan Finch-Race

Half-day international symposium. Friday 7 June 2019 at 2-8 pm. Free admission.

The Royal Institution, 21 Albemarle Street, London W1S 4BS

Founded in 1799, the Royal Institution became the home of science education and the site of scientific discoveries and technological innovations which changed the world. In its early years, this remarkable scientific agenda was accompanied by an equally impressive programme of literary education, as luminaries such as Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Thomas Campbell and Sydney Smith took to the lecture podium to dazzle the fashionable male and female audiences of London with the latest advances in literary criticism and aesthetics. Science, poetry and philosophy combined in the work of the ‘chemical philosopher’ Humphry Davy and his literary friends, making the Royal Institution a centre of Romanticism as well as a focal point of the thriving public lecture culture of the time. This half-day symposium with talks by leading scholars will restore the forgotten literary history of the Royal Institution and highlight its unique interdisciplinary contribution to British Romantic culture.

Speakers: David Duff (Queen Mary University of London), Frank James (Royal Institution), Hattie Lloyd Edmondson (Science Museum), Seamus Perry (University of Oxford), Sharon Ruston (University of Lancaster), Sarah Zimmerman (Fordham University)

The event will conclude with a wine reception to celebrate the launch of Sarah Zimmerman’s new book The Romantic Literary Lecture in Britain (Oxford University Press), based partly on research done at the Royal Institution.

The event is free and open to everyone, including members of the public.

Click here for further details and to register for a free place

Organisers: David Duff d.duff@qmul.ac.uk; Sarah Zimmerman Zimmerman@fordham.edu

Sponsored by the London-Paris Romanticism Seminar, the Fordham Romanticism Group, Queen Mary University of London, and the Royal Institution of Great Britain

Workshop organised by Dr Kim M. Hajek and Prof. Mary S. Morgan

3 June 2019, London School of Economics and Political Science

In the history of science, especially of the human and observational sciences, it has often been the case that knowledge-making activities drew upon many ‘voices’—accounts of a storm given by different observers; patient voices incorporated into a psychological case history; myths transcribed by an anthropologist. What many of these examples share is that the information provided by different voices takes narrative form in its own right. Yet scientists have also organised them into related groupings or broader narratives, as a way to elucidate particular research problems.

In this workshop, we ask how narrative has helped scientists to configure extended chunks of information, and ultimately to manage a multiplicity of voices in their enquiry. Using case studies from across a range of fields, workshop participants explore the roles played by narrative forms of explanation both within and across the contributions of multiple voices to science. Of particular concern are the ways that narrative serves to order polyphonic material into a larger epistemic scheme, and reciprocally, how narrative valorises or suppresses particular voices, or indeed shapes what counts as a ‘voice’ at all.

This workshop is organised as part of the Narrative Science Project, funded by the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement No 694732). For more information on the project, please see our website: www.narrative-science.org

Speakers:

Dr Debjani Bhattacharyya, Drexel University
Ordering Cyclones: The Courtroom in the Making of Meteorological Sciences in Colonial India.

A/Prof. Devin Griffiths, University of Southern California
Darwin, Entrainment, and the Ecology of Form..

Dr Kim Hajek, LSE
Silencing Suggestion? Narratives of Suggestive Psychotherapy and Category Disputes in Hippolyte Bernheim’s Psychological Cases.

Prof. Isabelle Kalinowski, ENS, and Dr Camille Joseph, Université Paris 8
Unheard Words. Franz Boas and the Anthropology of Voices.

A/Prof. Birgit Lang, University of Melbourne
The Case of the Sexological Patient. From Narrative Polyphony to Visual Affect and Fragmentation.

Prof. Harro Maas, Centre Walras-Pareto, University of Lausanne
A Community on Paper: Reflections on a Witness Seminar on the History of Experimental Economics.

A/Prof. Jill Slinger (and Dr Lotte Bontje), TU Delft
On Narrative Competition in Coastal Policy Development.

Dr Rhianedd Smith, University of Reading
Weaving Narratives from Data and Myth: Multi-Vocal Heritage Interpretation at Glastonbury Abbey.

Attending the Workshop:

The workshop will take place at the LSE campus in central London, from approximately 9 am to 6 pm.

Attendance at the workshop is free and open to all; however, places are limited. Please register your interest in attending by emailing Dr Dominic Berry (d.j.berry@lse.ac.uk) as soon as possible.

The deadline for registration is Monday 20 May. Places will be confirmed by 22 May at the latest.

PhD Travel Bursaries:

To increase participation from the postgraduate community, we are making available 4 travel bursaries, each of up to £250. These can be used to recover the cost of train or airfare for those who wish to attend, and who are currently enrolled on a PhD programme, preferably with research interests directly related to the workshop themes.

To apply for a PhD travel bursary please write to Dr Dominic Berry (D.J.Berry@lse.ac.uk). Please include: Your name; university affiliation; thesis title; no more than 100 words on how this workshop relates to your research.

The deadline for applications to the travel bursary is Monday 13 May.

You will be notified as to the outcome of your application shortly thereafter. Applicants will be selected to ensure a diverse range of research interests and institutions are represented. 

Expressions of interest are invited by the 1st of June for the BSLS Winter Symposium in 2019. As members will recall, this is a postgraduate and early career researcher-led event and presents a great opportunity to run a successful event at this stage in your career (with help and support from the BSLS Committee throughout the process).

Proposals are invited for a themed one-day event to take place in or about November, to be emailed to Rachel Murray at r.e.murray@lboro.ac.uk. As ever, it is hoped that the event will have a 'non-conference' feel, and will include different types of papers, panels, and ways of sharing knowledge. Proposals should be no longer than two sides of A4, and should include a theme and description, details of the organising group and location, potential speakers (if known) and types of papers, panels or other sessions to be included.  The BSLS will award around £500, depending on the budget required, in support of the symposium, which should be free to attend if possible.

For more about the symposium, including details of past events, see here.

This two-day interdisciplinary workshop is made possible thanks to the generous support of the British Academy (grant number BARSEA19\190021). It expands on the work of the Narrative Science project, a European Research Council funded project based at the London School of Economics (grant agreement No. 694732). It will take place in London on the 18th-19th of July.

The aim is to create a platform and a network for research at the intersections of the history of science and technology, literary studies, and the environmental humanities. The shared focus is accordingly on narrative, science, and environmental history. To these ends we are proud to have partnered with both the British Society for the History of Science and the British Society for Literature and Science. We have already gathered a range of expert speakers, who are listed alongside the titles of their talks at the bottom of this message. Further information about the workshop motivations and agenda can be found on the web page:
https://www.narrative-science.org/events-narrative-science-project-workshops-environment.html

In addition, as part of our networking, this event is organised in collaboration with 'Environment, Climate, and Heredity: the integration of environmental humanities with the history of heredity' to take place on the following Saturday, 20th of July, at Oxford, organised by Dr John Lidwell-Durnin. Further details will be announced soon.

Call for ECR presenters with posters - Deadline May 24th A key ambition of this workshop is to provide a platform and network for early career researchers (ECRs). For our purposes ECRs are defined as postgraduate and postdoctoral researchers not yet in permanent employment. There are 20 spaces available for ECRs across the two days. Each ECR presenter will have 10 minutes to speak about their work in a dedicated slot during the workshop plenary sessions, and will also provide a poster which will be showcased during the evening reception on the 18th of July. The poster reception will be an opportunity to talk directly and informally with all the other attendees in a relaxed atmosphere. All of the plenary sessions will be video recorded and eventually made available on the Narrative Science project website. At the moment we can only promise to reimburse hotel and travel expenses for these 20 ECRs up to £100, but we intend to increase this amount as much as possible. All catering is supplied to attendees across the two days free of charge, and we will also take care of the costs of poster printing. ECRs who are members of the BSHS may also be eligible to apply for a Butler-Eyles Travel Grant towards their travel costs.

To apply to the workshop please write to the organiser, Dr Dominic Berry, on d.j.berry@lse.ac.uk

In the email subject please write 'Your name - Environment workshop ECR', and in the message include:

  • Your status as independent scholar or affiliated with a particular institution/university.
  • Maximum 200 words on how this workshop relates to your ongoing research. 
  • Maximum 100 words on the kinds of material and arrangement you expect to include on your poster. 

Interested parties should obviously also feel free to contact us for any further information!

Confirmed speakers
Jon Agar (UCL) - "British Nature was Lost Here, 1964-71": what's at stake when scientists, nature writers and bureaucrats tell stories
Dominic J. Berry (LSE) - Narrative science in techno-environments
Animesh Chatterjee (Leeds Trinity University) - Urban, political and cultural environments in late-19th century Bengali anticolonial representations of electricity
Jean-Baptiste Gouyon (UCL) - Wildlife conservation as a cinematic project?
Alex Hall (University of Birmingham) - Who speaks for the flood? Exploring agency, expectations and the supernatural in extreme weather events
John Lidwell-Durnin (University of Oxford) - “Have they remained what they were in Europe?”: narrative, organisms, and environment in explorations of South America
Ina Linge (University of Exeter) - Narrating Human-animal Sexual Nature in 1920s Popular Science Books
Greg Lynall (University of Liverpool) - Reading Renewables: Stories of Solar Power
Harriet Ritvo (MIT) - The Stakes of Species
Anahita Rouyan (Independent scholar and consultant) - Producing Mutations: Scientific Plant Breeding and Narratives of Nature in the Progressive-Era United States, 1900-1914
Charlotte Sleigh (University of Kent) - Sugar in the air: carbon narratives, futures and endings
sam smiley (Astrodime Transit Authority) - Ornamentalism: The Migrations and Translations of Japanese Knotweed

C

Alluvium   is an online journal dedicated to twenty-first-century writing, affiliated with BACLS (British Association of Contemporary Literary Studies) as its Graduate-run journal.  It publishes short  (2-2500 word) academic articles on fiction as well as twenty-first-century approaches to the literary canon by researchers working at PG, ECR, Lecturer and Senior level. Alluvium encourages contributors to focus their articles around key issues and emerging trends within literature and literary criticism.  

The first issue of the relaunched journal was published in February 2019, available at www.alluvium-journal.org .  In June  2019 we are due to publish a special edition of the journal devoted to the Global Contemporary: Ecologies of Gender and Class within the Combined and Uneven Anthropocene. 

 As illustrated most prominently by the calls for a Green New Deal in the US, we live in an age when alternative political imaginaries are addressing the political and infrastructural necessities of combating symptoms and causes of cataclysmic climate change. Conversely, they are forced to confront: the epistemological difficulties, fragility of language and demobilizing anxiety associated with catastrophe; political recalcitrance; globalized mechanisms of disavowal and normalised precarity; and an underlying system of capital premised upon the exploitation of natural and social ecologies as well as the transnational flow of goods. Literature -- through the allegorical, the speculative, the psychological and phenomenological -- can provide an encounter with the ethical imperatives, hidden forces and effects which make up the Now as well as a way of signalling the future in its Utopian and terminal dimensions.

Submissions are invited on topics including (but not limited to):

  • Intersections (of Gender/Race/Class/Q) within Contemporary Cli-fi
  • Infrastructural Criticism in relation to ecologies, politics, literary form and the boundaries between speculative fiction-realism 
  • New Materialism and Enchanted Matter within dominant and peripheral literary spaces 
  • Post-structural geographies and the hauntological literary ethics of approaching the ecoeconomico-colonial South
  • Phenomenologies of local and global environment anxiety within Twenty-first Century fiction
  • Climate change, temporality and anxiety
  • Literary participation in, deconstruction of, or resistance to neo-liberal de-politicization of discourses on climate change
  • Formally realised or speculative takes on how current frameworks or researchers’ critical concerns might intersect with some dimension of the Eco-social (climate change, habitation, ecological mutations)  

Abstracts should be submitted as soon as possible -- and ideally by May 6th --  whilst the deadline for submission of articles is May 24th.

Please see the attached generic Contributor Guidelines for more information about writing for Alluvium. If you have any questions about writing for the June 'Global Contemporary' issue please contact Martin Goodhead (Keele) at m.c.goodhead@keele.ac.uk or Katie Jones (Swansea) at kate_216@hotmail.co.uk

CFP Performance and Science working group at TaPRA (Theatre and Performance Research Association) 4 – 6 September

Deadline: Monday 8 April 2019

We issue two calls for this year’s TAPRA conference: an open call inviting proposals that might help us map the vast terrain encompassed by ‘performance and science’; and a themed call for a joint session with the Bodies and Performance working group.  Both calls are intended as an initial scoping exercise for the Routledge Companion to Performance and Science, which is currently in development. We will consider proposals for the following formats

·         Papers, including those with performative elements (10-20 minutes).

·         Low tech workshops, installations, demonstrations or performance (up to 60 minutes).

·         Curated panels (usually 3 x 20 min papers)

Open Call Since its inception, our working group has defined its remit inclusively. This means embracing a wide range of performance practices that interface with scientific knowledge and the social, political, ethical and personal repercussions of these: science plays, bio-art, public engagement projects, performance art and more. We have also considered scientific approaches to understanding what performance is or does, and, reciprocally, analysed scientific practices through the lens of performance. Given this broad remit, how can we define the borders of our field and delineate its contents? How might we understand the overlaps, splices, tensions, alliances, antimonies, resonances that constitute the interface between performance and science, as practices, disciplinary domains, cultures and truth claims? Your proposal might posit conceptual tools for surveying or rethinking the field(s), trace strands within it and/or offer case studies and specimens. Alternatively, your proposal might interrogate – or rebel against – such projects of taxonomization and territorialisation.  In all cases, preference is given to proposals that foreground the material practices of ‘doing’ performance and science – whatever form this takes. Themes may include but are not limited to:

·         historiographies, genealogies, cartographies and case studies of performance and science

·         defining, distinguishing and defying disciplines: multi-, cross-, inter-, intra-, trans- and post-disciplinarity

·         the politics of science-performance collaboration

Negative Affects We are also holding a joint session aligning with the Bodies and Performance WG theme of Negative Affects, Performance and Bodies and that of our own interim event on human repair, regeneration and bodily alteration. We invite proposals that engage with the body and bad feelings, and how scientific discourses and technologies of repair, replacement and augmentation might alleviate or exacerbate those negative feelings. Submitting a proposal Please send a 300-word (max.) proposal and a short biography in a Word document via email. Please also include precise details of your resourcing needs, for example, any audio-visual technology, or a particular type of space (e.g. drama studio) that you will need to make your presentation. Email abstracts and information to the Working Group conveners, Alex Mermikides and Paul Johnson, at perfandscience@tapra.org The deadline for the submission of proposals is Monday 8th April 2019.     Early Career Researchers Bursary Scheme: If you are an Early Career Researcher, then you are eligible to be considered for a TaPRA ECR Bursary. Please follow this link for more information, and please indicate on your proposal whether you fit the criteria and wish to be considered for the bursary scheme: http://tapra.org/bursaries/ Postgraduate Bursary Scheme: There will be a separate call for PG Bursaries later in the year, but please do indicate in your proposal whether you are planning on applying to the scheme.

Please note: only one proposal may be submitted for a TaPRA event. It is not permitted to submit multiple proposals or submit the same proposal to several Calls for Participation. All presenters must be TaPRA members, i.e. registered for the event; this includes presentations given by Skype or other media broadcast even where the presenter may not physically attend the event venue.

Science and Performance Working Group Interim Event call for participants

TAPRA Performance & Science Interim Event

Science Gallery/King’s College, London

8 May 2019 2- 8.30pm

  The Performance & Science Working Group invites applications to attend our Interim Event at King’s College London, which takes up the theme of bodily regeneration, repair and replacement. The emerging sciences of regenerative medicine promise the possibility of combating terrifying disease and physical trauma. They also sharpen our fears about cyborg and synthetic beings. This ambivalence offers rich ground for performance-makers and those who study the interface between theatre, performance and the human sciences.

The event involves meetings with scientists at the cutting edge of regenerative medicine, a tour of the laboratories at the Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine and of the Spare Parts exhibition, a working dinner and attending a related science-performance.

The event is FREE to all TAPRA members but places are limited. To apply for a place, please email perfandscience@tapra.org by 12 April 2019 with a brief (100 word) outline of how the event will support your current or future research. Priority will be given to those whose research aligns most closely with the event. Postgraduate students can also apply for support with travel costs – please include estimated costs in your email. The criteria for funding will be lack of institutional support, alignment of research interest to the event, cost of travel.

All participants must be TaPRA members. If you are not currently a member, you will be asked to join the organization at the interim rate of £15 before the date of the event.

Schedule

  2-4pm: visit to Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine

4- 5.30 pm: tour of the Spare Parts exhibition at the Science Gallery. This exhibition explores the art, science, ethics and technology that enables human repair and alteration. It considers the emotional and psychological aspects of living with a replacement organ or limb; organic or engineered.

5.45-6.45pm: working dinner: reflecting on performances of bodily repair, replacement and recuperation.

7 – 8.30: performance: New Organs of Creation

New Organs of Creation presents a hypothetical development of the human larynx (voice box), using tissue engineering, to extend the ability of the voice as a transformational instrument. The project is made in collaboration with Prof Lucy Di-Silvio who used tissue engineering to grow human cells on the prototype anatomical larynx.

Tags:

Please see link above for further details.

SCVS is delighted to be co-hosting the British Association of Victorian Studies 2019 conference at the University of Dundee, 28-30 August 2019, on the theme ‘Victorian Renewals.’ The CFP has now been released (PDF below), and we are accepting paper proposals for a deadline of 1 March 2019. Confirmed keynote speakers include Prof Jo McDonagh, University of Chicago; Prof Heather Shore, Leeds Beckett; and Prof Lorraine Janzen Kooistra, Ryerson University, Toronto. The opening day will feature a plenary roundtable on ‘Scotland and Victorian Studies’, with Prof Gerry Carruthers, Prof Penny Fielding, Prof Aileen Fyfe and Prof Murdo Macdonald.

BAVS 2019 Call for Papers

Conference website, hosted by Dundee and Angus Convention Bureau.

A train crosses the new Tay Bridge, with the stumps of the first Tay Bridge visible. Photo courtesy of Dundee Central Library, Wellgate, Dundee

The conference will start on the morning of the 28th and end mid-afternoon on the 30th. Sessions will take place on the university campus, which is in the city centre, approximately 10-15 mins walk from the railway station.

Dundee’s Victorian heritage and influence is visible throughout the city, but our theme also celebrates the ongoing renewals and renovations of this heritage, most notably embodied in the £1bn renewal of the waterfront and its flagship building, the V&A Museum of Design, opened in September 2018. Dundee is an easily walkable city, and attractions for Victorianists also include the McManus Gallery and MuseumVerdant Works (the Jute Museum) , HMS Unicorn, and the rich research materials held by Dundee Central Library and Dundee City Archives. It has a thriving arts and creative scene and there are numerous entertainment and eating and drinking venues within a short walk of the conference location.  The city is readily accessible by train from either the West Coast (Glasgow- c.1.5 hours to Dundee) or East Coast (Edinburgh – c.1-1.5 hrs to Dundee) main lines. It is also accessible by bus or train from Edinburgh or Glasgow airports, which are served by most major airlines, and limited flights are available from London Stansted to Dundee Airport (Loganair) around the conference dates. A conference discount of 30% applies to Stansted-Dundee flights from 27-30 August (see the main conference website for details).

For further information or conference queries, email the conference address: bavs2019@dundee.ac.uk, or contact lead organisers Kirstie Blair (kirstie.blair@strath.ac.uk) or Daniel Cook (d.p.cook@dundee.ac.uk).

« Older entries § Newer entries »

css.php