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A half day conference on Children's Literature and Science at Edinburgh Napier University, 22 February 2019. To attend please contact em.alder@napier.ac.uk

5 July 2019, 10:00–19:00

Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Boltzmannstraße 22, 14195 Berlin

The Institute for German and Dutch Philology and Friedrich Schlegel Graduate School of the Free University of Berlin, in collaboration with the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, invite early career scholars to take part in the 14th Forum on Literature and Science History, also known as Studientag Literatur und Wissenschaftsgeschichte, which will be held on 5th July 2019, 10 am – 7 pm, at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science.

The Forum on Literature and Science History offers early career scholars an opportunity to discuss their work-in-progress themed on the history of literature and science, as well as other closely relevant topics. To maximize the impact of our discussion for participants, we especially encourage presentations of unfinished projects in various stages of development.

In this view, all accepted speakers will be requested to pre-circulate papers of 10–20 pages among all registered participants. The papers can be written in English or German. The discussion of all papers will start with comments by experts appointed by the organizers and followed by responses of the authors, each paper receiving about an hour of discussion time.

All interested early career scholars are warmly invited to apply for participation in the Forum by 15 March 2019 with a title, an abstract of up to 500 words of the proposed paper, and an indication of academic affiliation. Accepted speakers will be requested to confirm participation and pre-circulate their papers in PDF format by 17 June 2019.

For registration and questions please contact:

Luca Lil Wirth: lucawirth@zedat.fu-berlin.de

Applicants are sought for a three-year, fully-funded studentship to work towards a PhD in the Ruskin Research Centre and the Department of History at Lancaster University and at The Royal Society on the AHRC project ‘Soirées, science, arts and museums: region and metropolis, 1850–1924’. This collaborative doctoral award (CDA) will be supervised jointly by Professor Sandra Kemp and Dr Christopher Donaldson of Lancaster University, and Keith Moore, Head of Library and Information Services at the Royal Society. 

The studentship will commence in October 2019 and is open to UK nationals, or EU nationals who have resided in the UK for 3 years or more. The successful applicant will normally have achieved a Master’s degree (or equivalent) in history, history of science, art history, literature or museums studies, or will have done so by October 2019. The deadline for applications is 18th February.

To find out more about the project and apply, click here.


In honour of John Ruskin’s bicentenary, the Oxford University Museum of Natural History will be hosting a one-day conference on Ruskin, Science and the Environment on Friday 8th February 2019 from 9.30 until 6. The conference is being run jointly by the AHRC-funded Constructing Scientific Communities project and the ERC-funded Diseases of Modern Life project at the University of Oxford, and the Nineteenth-Century Centre at the University of Birmingham, in conjunction with the museum. To see the full programme, click below:

Registration for the conference costs £20 (full-price) or £10 for students and other unwaged delegates. To register, please click here

At 6 in the evening, the conference will be followed by a free public lecture by Fiona Stafford (Oxford) on ‘Ruskin’s Trees’. To register, please click here

Alongside the conference, we will be holding a rare exhibitions of designs for the museum by Ruskin and a number of Pre-Raphaelite artists. The exhibition will be open to all conference delegates, and to visitors to the lecture on a first-come, first-served basis, as numbers are limited.

For further information, please email Catherine Charlwood at catherine.charlwood@ell.ox.ac.uk.

Sally Shuttleworth (Oxford) and John Holmes (Birmingham)

The Metaphor Lab Amsterdam is delighted to announce that the next Metaphor Festival will take place in Amsterdam from 28 - 31 August 2019. The Metaphor Festival is an annual conference on the use of figurative language and other modes of figurative expression. It offers an opportunity to present and learn about research findings concerning the structures, functions, and effects of figurative language in human communication. Contributions to the Festival can address tropes such as metaphor, metonymy, hyperbole and irony.

Please go to http://metaphorlab.org/metaphor-festival/metaphor-festival-19/ or our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/metaphorfestival) for more information. Deadline for submissions is 15 March.

Travels and Travelers

Syros, Greece July  1–3, 2019

The International Commission on Science and Literature DHST/IUHPST, The School of Humanities of the Hellenic Open University and the Institute of Historical Research/National Hellenic Research Foundation organize a three-days’ workshop to study “Travels and Travelers” in a multidisciplinary perspective within Science, Philosophy and Literature. . The CoSciLit workshop is already an established part of the very prestigious “Hermoupolis Seminars” which have been organized for more than 30 years every July on Syros Island.

This workshop aims to discuss various views for the role and presence of travels and travelers in science, philosophy and literature. The conference offers an open forum for all scholars interested in this growing research field, thus bringing into the dialogue multiple perspectives and different disciplines in order to build communication and cooperation bridges between science, philosophy, and literature.

Confirmed speakers: David Fairer (Leeds), Greg Garrard (British Columbia), Sue Edney (Bristol)

Including a reading of poetry and prose with Simon Armitage, Helen Jukes, and Jack Thacker

The influence and spirit of ‘georgic’, as a genre or mode – named for Virgil’s Georgics, the primary classical model – can be seen across western art and culture: from medieval and early modern almanacs to eighteenth-century formal georgic poems, from pre-Raphaelite social paintings to the new nature writing of the twenty-first century. Writers and artists have used the georgic mode to explore a broad range of significant themes, including nationhood and empire, industry, the experience of war, the cultivation of the self, and humans’ relationships with the natural world. The importance and richness of georgic as a genre or mode is increasingly recognised by researchers, but it is difficult to define something that has been reworked in so many ways: does georgic have to be didactic? does it have to be about labour, about nature, about agriculture? how is it different from pastoral?

This will be the first conference to focus on post-antiquity uses and adaptations of the georgic mode. It will bring together researchers working across periods and disciplines to analyse how and why georgic has been worked and reworked so extensively, and to develop and celebrate this growing field of study. 

We welcome proposals of around 250 words for twenty-minute papers or for presentations in other formats. We also welcome proposals for pre-formed panels of three or four papers. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

• Definitions and limitations of the term ‘georgic’ 
• Georgic’s relation to pastoral and other genres 
• Agriculture in literature and the arts, e.g. agricultural life writing
• The political, social, and scientific contexts of georgic 
• Ecocritical approaches to georgic 
• Global georgics and postcolonial readings of georgic 
• Queer georgic and feminist georgic 
• Georgic in the visual arts, film, and other media 
• The reception of classical models for the georgic 

The deadline for proposals is 30th April 2019.

Please send proposals, and any enquiries, to georgic@leeds.ac.uk

Conference organisers: Tess Somervell and Pippa Marland Conference website: https://georgic.leeds.ac.uk/conference/

This conference is supported by the British Academy and the Leverhulme Trust. 

Oxford University's series of seminars on Science, Medicine and Culture in the Nineteenth Century continues this term:

Tuesday 29 January 2019 (Week 3)
Prof Anne-Julia Zwierlein, University of Regensburg
Monstrous Voices: (Female) Speaking Automata, Mind Science and Mass Mediation in Late-Nineteenth-Century British Fiction
5.30—7.00, Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College

Tuesday 12 February 2019 (Week 5)
Dr Ushashi Dasgupta, University of Oxford
Dickens’s Loneliness
5.30—7.00, Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College

Wednesday 27 February 2019 (Week 7)
Professor Gowan Dawson, University of Leicester
‘A Monkey into a Man’: Thomas Henry Huxley, Benjamin Waterhouse Hawkins and the Making of an Evolutionary Icon
5.30—7.00, Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College

Drinks will be served after each seminar. All welcome, no booking required.

INTERNATIONAL SUMMER SCHOOL

CARDIFF UNIVERSITY, UK

MONDAY 20 MAY – FRIDAY 24 MAY 2019

Keynote Speaker: Professor Sally Shuttleworth (University of Oxford)

A free, international, postgraduate summer school

In 2019 Cardiff University’s ScienceHumanities research group will host the second week-long International Summer School dedicated to the examination of the relations between the humanities and the sciences and funded by Wellcome. This year the Summer School will have the theme of “Populations”. The Summer School will have as its keynote speaker Professor Sally Shuttleworth (University of Oxford), and will also feature workshops from leading scholars in literature and science, and the histories of science and medicine, from across the UK and Europe.

The Summer School will not only give participants access to significant researchers in the field, but will also offer professional development opportunities on publishing, public engagement, and archival research. In addition, you will have the opportunity to share ideas, concepts and methods with other doctoral students and begin to build a network of global contacts.

The Summer School is open only to doctoral students located in universities and research centres worldwide. There are only 12 places available. BSLS Members very welcome to apply! It is free to attend, but participants must be able to pay for their own transport, accommodation and part of their subsistence during their stay in Cardiff. Advice will be given on accommodation and transport and some meals will be included during the Summer School. Two bursaries are available for students from nations with limited resources.

To express initial interest and receive an application form please email Professor Martin Willis on willism8@cardiff.ac.uk. The closing date for expressions of interest is Friday 25thJanuary 2019. Applications must be submitted by Friday 1stFebruary 2019 and decisions will be made by 15thFebruary. Participating doctoral students must be able to commit to the full 5 days of the Summer School.

To see what last year’s participants gained from the Summer School watch the short video at: https://cardiffsciencehumanities.org/summer-school/

In honour of John Ruskin’s bicentenary, the Oxford University Museum of Natural History will be hosting a one-day conference on Ruskin, Science and the Environment on Friday 8th February 2019 from 9.30 until 6. Speakers will include Kate Flint (Southern California), Mark Frost (Portsmouth), Peter Garratt (Durham), Sandra Kemp (Director of the Ruskin Research Centre, Lancaster), Francis O’Gorman (Edinburgh), John Parham (Worcester) and Marcus Waithe (Cambridge). There will also be a brief introduction to Ruskin Land from John Iles and a tour of the museum by John Holmes (Birmingham). At 6 in the evening, the conference will be followed by a public lecture by Fiona Stafford (Oxford) on ‘Ruskin’s Trees’.

Registration for the conference on Ruskin, Science and the Environment costs £20 (full-price) or £10 for students and other unwaged delegates. To register, please click here

Fiona Stafford's public lecture on 'Ruskin's Trees' is free of charge. To register, please click here

If you would like to attend both events, please register for each of them separately. 

For further information, please email Catherine Charlwood at catherine.charlwood@ell.ox.ac.uk.

Sally Shuttleworth (Oxford) and John Holmes (Birmingham)

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